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Rare Antique Ancient egyptian Statue God Seth & Pharaoh Amenhotep 1386–1349BC

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Seller: shaahmabd (57) 100%, Location: cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 142611616196 You Are Bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Statue God Seth while putting his Hand on King Pharaoh Amenhotep while Holding Key of life and putting on it on king Amenhotep while at back written parts of book of dead. Since at that period god horus god seth were fighting and in wars so god horus divided egypt between them since god horus became god of liwer egypt and god seth was god of upper egypt. So king Amenhotep favoured god horus and he gas falcons and he was in love with god horus so god seth was angry from these so he is showing here is holding king amenhotep trying to attract him and putting his key of life on the king which will give the king eternal life. Since king Amenhotep loved god horus who was god of lower egypt since god horus was with fight with god seth since god horus was god of good things and god seth was god of Evil so god seth was angry that king Amenhotep favoured God Horus so here it is shown he is inviting him at upper Egypt Holding him and giving him key of life which will give him elternal life. Also you can can see at back part of book of dead also it seems that the colour was green but colour has been removed due to time since you can see at back some green dots which has removed due to time. Such statues were made during ancient King Amenhotep life also was taken to his tomb after his life Height:23 cmWidth:11 cm God Seth Set is a god of the desert,storms, disorder, violence, and foreigners in ancient Egyptian religion.the god's name is given as Sēth. Set had a positive role where he accompanies Ra on his solar boat to repel Apep, the serpent of Chaos.Set had a vital role as a reconciled combatant. He was lord of the red (desert) land where he was the balance to Horus' role as lord of the black (soil) land. In Egyptian mythology, Set is portrayed as the usurper who killed and mutilated his own brother Osiris. Osiris' wife Isisreassembled (remembered) Osiris' corpse and resurrected him long enough to conceive his son and heir Horus. Horus sought revenge upon Set, and the myths describe their conflicts. This Osiris myth is a prominent theme in Egyptian mythology. Set's siblings are Osiris, Isis, and Nephthys. He married Nephthys and fathered Anubis; and in some accounts he had relationships with the foreign goddesses Anat, and Astarte. The meaning of the name Set is unknown but it is thought to have been originally pronounced *sūtiẖ based on spellings of his name in Egyptian hieroglyphs as stẖ andswtẖ.] The Late Egyptian spelling stš reflects the palatalization of ẖ while the eventual loss of the final consonant is recorded in spellings like swtj. The Copticform of the name, ⲥⲏⲧ Sēt, is the basis for the English vocalization In art, Set is usually depicted as an enigmatic creature referred to by Egyptologists as the Set animal, a beast resembling no known creature, although it could be seen as a composite of an aardvark, a donkey, a jackal or a fennec fox. The animal has a curved snout, long rectangular ears, a thin forked tail and canine body, with sprouted fur tufts in an inverted arrow shape; sometimes, Set is depicted as a human with the distinctive head. Some early Egyptologists proposed that it was a stylised representation of the giraffe, owing to the large flat-topped "horns" which correspond to a giraffe'sossicones. The Egyptians themselves, however, made a distinction between the giraffe and the Set animal. During the Late Period, Set is depicted as a donkey or as having a donkey's head.The earliest representations of what might be the Set animal comes from a tomb dating to the Naqada I phase of thePredynastic Period (3790 BC–3500 BC), though this identification is uncertain. If these are ruled out, then the earliest Set animal appears on a mace head of the King Scorpion, a ruler of the Protodynastic Period. The head and the forked tail of the Set animal are clearly present. In the mythology of Heliopolis, Set was born of the sky goddess Nut and the earth god Geb. Set's sister and wife wasNephthys. Nut and Geb also produced another two children who became husband and wife: the divine Osiris and Isis, whose son was Horus. The myth of Set's conflict with Horus, Osiris, and Isis appears in many Egyptian sources, including the Pyramid Texts, the Coffin Texts, the Shabaka Stone, inscriptions on the walls of the temple of Horus at Edfu, and various papyrus sources. Papyrus contains the legend known as The Contendings of Horus and Set. Classical authors also recorded the story, notablyPlutarch's De Iside et Osiride.These myths generally portray Osiris as a wise lord, king, and bringer of civilization, happily married to his sister, Isis. Set was envious of his brother, and he killed and dismembered Osiris. Isis reassembled Osiris' corpse and embalmed him. As the archetypal mummy, Osiris reigned over the afterworld as a king among deserving spirits of the dead. Osiris' son Horus was conceived by Isis with Osiris' corpse. Horus naturally became the enemy of Set, and had many battles against Set for the kingship of Egypt. During these battles, Set was associated with Upper Egypt while Horus became Lower Egypt's patron.According to Papyrus , Set is depicted as trying to prove his dominance by seducing Horus and then having intercourse with him. However, Horus places his hand between his thighs and catches Set's semen, then subsequently throws it in the river, so that he may not be said to have been inseminated by Set. Horus then deliberately spreads his own semen on some lettuce, which was Set's favorite food. After Set had eaten the lettuce, they went to the gods to try to settle the argument over the rule of Egypt. The gods first listened to Set's claim of dominance over Horus, and call his semen forth, but it answered from the river, invalidating his claim. Then, the gods listened to Horus' claim of having dominated Set, and call his semen forth, and it answered from inside Set.However, Set still refused to relent, and the other gods were getting tired from over eighty years of fighting and challenges. Horus and Set challenged each other to a boat race, where they each raced in a boat made of stone. Horus and Set agreed, and the race started. But Horus had an edge: his boat was made of wood painted to resemble stone, rather than true stone. Set's boat, being made of heavy stone, sank, but Horus's did not. Horus then won the race, and Set stepped down and officially gave Horus the throne of Egypt. But after the New Kingdom, Set still was considered Lord of the desert and its oases.The same myth was also described in the prognosis texts of the Calendar of Lucky and Unlucky Days of papyrus , where the actions of Set were connected to the phases of the Moon. It has been suggested that the myth may reflect historical events. According to the Shabaka Stone, Geb divided Egypt into two halves, giving Upper Egypt (the desert south) to Set and Lower Egypt (the region of the delta in the north) to Horus, in order to end their feud. However, according to the stone, in a later judgment Geb gave all Egypt to Horus. Interpreting this myth as a historical record would lead one to believe that Lower Egypt (Horus' land) conquered Upper Egypt (Set's land); but, in fact Upper Egypt conquered Lower Egypt. So the myth cannot be simply interpreted.Several theories exist to explain the discrepancy. For instance, since both Horus and Set were worshipped in Upper Egypt prior to unification, perhaps the myth reflects a struggle within Upper Egypt prior to unification, in which a Horus-worshipping group subjugated a Set-worshipping group. What is known is that during the Second Dynasty, there was a period in which the King Peribsen's name or Serekh – which had been surmounted by a Horus falcon in the First Dynasty– was for a time surmounted by a Set animal, suggesting some kind of religious struggle. It was ended at the end of the dynasty by Khasekhemwy, who surmounted his Serekh with both a falcon of Horus and a Set animal, indicating some kind of compromise had been reached.Regardless, once the two lands were united, Set and Horus were often shown together crowning the new pharaohs, as a symbol of their power over both Lower and Upper Egypt. Queens of the First Dynasty bore the title "She Who Sees Horus and Set." The Pyramid Texts present the pharaoh as a fusion of the two deities. Evidently, pharaohs believed that they balanced and reconciled competing cosmic principles. Eventually the dual-god Horus-Set appeared, combining features of both deities (as was common in Egyptian theology, the most familiar example being Amun-Ra).Later Egyptians interpreted the myth of the conflict between Set and Osiris/Horus as an analogy for the struggle between the desert (represented by Set) and the fertilizing floods of the Nile (Osiris/Horus). Set was depicted standing on the prow of Ra's bargedefeating the dark serpent Apep. In some Late Periodrepresentations, such as in the Persian Period Temple of Hibis at Khargah, Set was represented in this role with afalcon's head, taking on the guise of Horus. In the Amduat Set is described as having a key role in overcoming Apep. During the Second Intermediate Period (1650–1550 BC), a group of Asiatic foreign chiefs known as the Hyksos (literally, "rulers of foreign lands") gained the rulership of Egypt, and ruled the Nile Delta, from Avaris. They chose Set, originally Upper Egypt's chief god, the god of foreigners and the god they found most similar to their own chief god, as their patron. Set then became worshiped as the chief god once again. The Hyksos King Apophis is recorded as worshiping Set exclusively, as described in the following passage:[He] chose for his Lord the god Seth. He did not worship any other deity in the whole land except Seth. ancient Egyptians could never conceive of a "lonely" god lacking personality, Seth the desert god, who was worshiped on his own, represented a manifestation of evil.When, c. 1522 BC, Ahmose I overthrew the Hyksos and expelled them, Egyptians' attitudes towards Asiatic foreigners became xenophobic, and royal propaganda discredited the period of Hyksos rule. The Set cult at Avaris flourished, nevertheless, and the Egyptian garrison of Ahmose stationed there became part of the priesthood of Set.The founder of the Nineteenth Dynasty, Ramesses I came from a military family from Avaris with strong ties to the priesthood of Set. Several of the Ramesside kings were named after the god, most notably Seti I (literally, "man of Set") and Setnakht (literally, "Set is strong"). In addition, one of the garrisons of Ramesses II held Set as its patron deity, and Ramesses II erected the so-called Four Hundred Years' Stele at Pi-Ramesses, commemorating the 400-year anniversary of the Set cult in the Delta.Set also became associated with foreign gods during theNew Kingdom, particularly in the Delta. Set was also identified by the Egyptians with the Hittite deity Teshub, who, like Seth, was a storm god. the demonization of Set took place after Egypt's conquest by several foreign nations in theThird Intermediate and Late Periods. Set, who had traditionally been the god of foreigners, thus also became associated with foreign oppressors, including the Assyrianand Persian empires.[] It was during this time that Set was particularly vilified, and his defeat by Horus widely celebrated.Set's negative aspects were emphasized during this period. Set was the killer of Osiris, having hacked Osiris' body into pieces and dispersed it so that he could not be resurrected. later associate Set with Typhon, a monstrous and evil force of raging nature. Both were sons of deities representing the Earth (Gaia and Geb) who attacked the principal deities (Osiris for Set, Zeus for Typhon).Nevertheless, throughout this period, in some outlying regions of Egypt, Set was still regarded as the heroic chief deity.Set has also been classed as a trickster deity who, as a god of disorder, resorts to deception to achieve bad ends Amenhotep III Amenhotep III meaning Amun is Satisfied), also known as Amenhotep the Magnificent, was the ninth pharaoh of theEighteenth Dynasty.ruled Egypt from June 1386 to 1349 BC, or from June 1388 BC to December 1351 BC/1350 BC,[4after his father Thutmose IV died. Amenhotep III was Thutmose's son by a minor wife, His reign was a period of unprecedented prosperity and artistic splendour, when Egypt reached the peak of its artistic and international power. When he died in the 38th or 39th year of his reign, his son initially ruled as Amenhotep IV, but then changed his own royal name to Akhenaten.The son of the future Thutmose IV (the son ofAmenhotep II) and a minor wife Mutemwiya, Amenhotep was born around 1388 BC.He was a member of the Thutmosid family that had ruled Egypt for almost 150 years since the reign of Thutmose I.Amenhotep III was the father of two sons with his Great Royal Wife Tiye. Their first son,Crown Prince Thutmose, predeceased his father and their second son, Amenhotep IV, later known as Akhenaten, ultimately succeeded Amenhotep III to the throne. Amenhotep III has the distinction of having the most surviving statues of any Egyptian pharaoh, with over 250 of his statues having been discovered . Since these statues span his entire life, they provide a series of portraits covering the entire length of his reign. Another striking characteristic of Amenhotep III's reign is the series of over 200 largecommemorative stone scarabs that have been discovered over a large geographic area ranging from Syria (Ras Shamra) through toSoleb in Nubia.Their lengthy inscribed texts extol the accomplishments of the pharaoh. For instance, 123 of these commemorative scarabs record the large number of lions (either 102 or 110 depending on the reading) that Amenhotep III killed "with his own arrows" from his first regnal year up to his tenth year.Similarly, five other scarabs state that the foreign princess who would become a wife to him, Gilukhepa, arrived in Egypt with a retinue of 317 women. She was the first of many such princesses who would enter the pharaoh's household. Amenhotep appears to have been crowned while still a child, perhaps between the ages of 6 and 12. It is likely that a regent acted for him if he was made pharaoh at that early age. He married Tiye two years later and she lived twelve years after his death. His lengthy reign was a period of unprecedented prosperity and artistic splendour, when Egypt reached the peak of her artistic and international power. Proof of this is shown by the diplomatic correspondence from the rulers of Assyria,Mitanni, Babylon, and Hatti which is preserved in the archive of Amarna Letters; these letters document frequent requests by these rulers for gold and numerous other gifts from the pharaoh. The letters cover the period from Year 30 of Amenhotep III until at least the end of Akhenaten's reign. Book of dead Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of theNew Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of textsconsisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw,] is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The Book of the Dead was part of a tradition of funerary texts which includes the earlierPyramid Texts and Coffin Texts, which were painted onto objects, not papyrus. Some of the spells included were drawn from these older works and date to the 3rd millennium BCE. Other spells were composed later in Egyptian history, dating to the Third Intermediate Period (11th to 7th centuries BCE). A number of the spells which made up the Book continued to be inscribed on tomb walls and sarcophagi, as had always been the spells from which they originated. The Book of the Dead was placed in the coffin or burial chamber of the deceased.There was no single or canonical Book of the Dead. The surviving papyri contain a varying selection of religious and magical texts and vary considerably in their illustration. Some people seem to have commissioned their own copies of the Book of the Dead, perhaps choosing the spells they thought most vital in their own progression to the afterlife. TheBook of the Dead was most commonly written in hieroglyphic or hieratic script on a papyrusscroll, and often illustrated with vignettesdepicting the deceased and their journey into the afterlife. The Book of the Dead is made up of a number of individual texts and their accompanying illustrations. Most sub-texts begin with the word ro, which can mean mouth, speech, a chapter of a book, spell, utterance, or incantation. This ambiguity reflects the similarity in Egyptian thought between ritual speech and magical power. In the context of the Book of the Dead, it is typically translated as either "chapter" or "spell". In this article, the word "spell" is used.At present, some 192 spells are known,[]though no single manuscript contains them all. They served a range of purposes. Some are intended to give the deceased mystical knowledge in the afterlife, or perhaps to identify them with the gods: for instance, Spell 17, is an obscure and lengthy description of the god Atum.Others are incantations to ensure the different elements of the dead person's being were preserved and reunited, and to give the deceased control over the world around him. Still others protect the deceased from various hostile forces, or guide him through the underworld past various obstacles. Famously, two spells also deal with the judgement of the deceased in theWeighing of the Heart ritual.Such spells as 26-30, and sometimes spells 6 and 126 relate to the heart, and were inscribed on scarabs.The texts and images of the Book of the Deadwere magical as well as religious. Magic was as legitimate an activity as praying to the gods, even when the magic was aimed at controlling the gods themselves.[] Indeed, there was little distinction for the Ancient Egyptians between magical and religious practice.The concept of magic (heka) was also intimately linked with the spoken and written word. The act of speaking a ritual formula was an act of creation;there is a sense in which action and speech were one and the same thing.] The magical power of words extended to the written word. Hieroglyphic script was held to have been invented by the god Thoth, and the hieroglyphs themselves were powerful. Written words conveyed the full force of a spell.This was even true when the text was abbreviated or omitted, as often occurred in later Book of the Dead scrolls, particularly if the accompanying images were present.The Egyptians also believed that knowing the name of something gave power over it; thus, the Book of the Dead equips its owner with the mystical names of many of the entities he would encounter in the afterlife, giving him power over them.The spells of the Book of the Dead made use of several magical techniques which can also be seen in other areas of Egyptian life. A number of spells are for magical amulets, which would protect the deceased from harm. In addition to being represented on a Book of the Dead papyrus, these spells appeared on amulets wound into the wrappings of a mummy.Everyday magic made use of amulets in huge numbers. Other items in direct contact with the body in the tomb, such as headrests, were also considered to have amuletic value.A number of spells also refer to Egyptian beliefs about the magical healing power of such book Key of life Ankh, also called the Egyptian cross was a symbol of life itself.The Ankh represented eternal life.It signified wisdom and insight on the highest level and it was also a fertility symbol.The ankhwas widely used as an amulet in Ancient Egypt.The Ankh was the Ultimate Gift of LifeMany reliefs in Ancient Egyptian temples show scenes where the king is offered the ankh by the gods.This symbolized the divine bestowal of eternal life.One painting shows the goddess Hathor holding the ankh up under the nose of Nefertari. Queen Nefertari received the breath of life from the goddess herself. Images of the ankh were all over the place. The painting shows the Horus passing the ankh to a pharaoh. As a symbol of fertility the loop represented the vagina and the line below the penis in union with the vagina. This certainly also reflects the creation of new life not to be misunderstood.This is man and woman in perfect union. By joining together man and woman in perfect harmony, new life is created.The arms stretching out is said to represent the children created from the unification of male and female.From the spiritual point of view the ankh represented the key to all hidden knowledge. The loop symbolized the eternal soul as it has no beginning or end.The cross in this spiritual interpretation represented death. The ankh was the key to unraveling the mysteries of life and death. Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- Shipment takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 3 days from shipment condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As shown At picture, Provenance: Luxor, Material: Stone

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