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Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Temple God Anubis House God W Scarab 1820-1760BC

$1,200.00 or Best Offer Unsold, $120.00 Shipping, 14-Day Returns

Seller: egyptanubis (58) 100%, Location: Cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 152917477349 You Are Bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Temple For God Anubis which is sitting inside if you opened Door You will find God Anubis shown As Jackal.while over the Temple you can find Ancient Egyptian Scarab which brings luck. These Temple was Carved by Ancient Egyptians at Basalt Stone. Since you can see the Temple has door and you can open it when the worship God Anubis since you open the Door you will find God Anubis sitting while over scarab to bring luck. Not all Egyptians were to enter temples since only priests can enter it also some Ancient Egyptians were living very far from Temples so they cannot Go to temples at feasts to worship God so they made such small Temples to put At home to worship Gods since they thought Temples was House of Gods such small Temples were very Rare since to make it you have to get permission of priests and Priests give permission to make small temples only to people who live away far from huge temples. So such small temples were very Rare. You can see they have made the temple they have wrote on it Sacred words which were used to worship God Anubis and they used to read when they Come to worship God Anubis. Since you can see they have made door for temple with lock they can open when they Come to worship God Anubis and they close when finish. Such temples they used to clean every day also they used to offer God Sacrifice. Since scarab up they thought it will bring luck. Such temple was House of God Anubis God of Under world cemtries embalming so it was very important for them they used to clean every day take care of it Height: 21 cmWidth: 12 cm Temples Temples were very important in ancient Egypt and people believed that these were places where gods and goddesses lived. Every god or goddess had a different temple where he or she was worshipped by the priests of the temple and the pharaoh. Temples here were not a place of communal worship and it was just the king and the priests who conducted rituals and that too after rigorous purification. Public was allowed here only during the festivals when the god came out of the temple. Egyptian temples were built for the official worship of the gods and in commemoration of the pharaohs in ancient Egypt and regions under Egyptian control. Temples were seen as houses for the gods or kings to whom they were dedicated. Within them, the Egyptians performed a variety of rituals, the central functions of Egyptian religion: giving offerings to the gods, reenacting their mythological interactions through festivals, and warding off the forces of chaos. These rituals were seen as necessary for the gods to continue to uphold maat, the divine order of the universe. Housing and caring for the gods were the obligations of pharaohs, who therefore dedicated prodigious resources to temple construction and maintenance. Out of necessity, pharaohs delegated most of their ritual duties to a host of priests, but most of the populace was excluded from direct participation in ceremonies and forbidden to enter a temple's most sacred areas. Nevertheless, a temple was an important religious site for all classes of Egyptians, who went there to pray, give offerings, and seek oracular guidance from the god dwelling within.The most important part of the temple was the sanctuary, which typically contained a cult image, a statue of its god. The rooms outside the sanctuary grew larger and more elaborate over time, so that temples evolved from small shrines in the late Predynastic Period (late fourth millennium BC) to large stone edifices in the New Kingdom (c. 1550–1070 BC) and later. These edifices are among the largest and most enduring examples of Egyptian architecture, with their elements arranged and decorated according to complex patterns of religious symbolism. Their typical design consisted of a series of enclosed halls, open courts, and entrance pylons aligned along the path used for festival processions. Beyond the temple proper was an outer wall enclosing a wide variety of secondary buildings.A large temple also owned sizable tracts of land and employed thousands of laymen to supply its needs. Temples were therefore key economic as well as religious centers. The priests who managed these powerful institutions wielded considerable influence, and despite their ostensible subordination to the king they may have posed significant challenges to his authority. Acient Egyptian temples were meant as places for the gods to reside on earth. Indeed, the term the Egyptians most commonly used to describe the temple building, ḥwt-nṯr, means "mansion (or enclosure) of a god". A god's presence in the temple linked the human and divine realms and allowed humans to interact with the god through ritual. These rituals, it was believed, sustained the god and allowed it to continue to play its proper role in nature. They were therefore a key part of the maintenance of maat, the ideal order of nature and of human society in Egyptian belief.Maintaining maat was the entire purpose of Egyptian religion, and it was the purpose of a temple as well.Because he was credited with divine power himself, the pharaoh, as a sacred king, was regarded as Egypt's representative to the gods and its most important upholder of maat.Thus, it was theoretically his duty to perform the temple rites. While it is uncertain how often he participated in ceremonies, the existence of temples across Egypt made it impossible for him to do so in all cases, and most of the time these duties were delegated to priests. The pharaoh was nevertheless obligated to maintain, provide for, and expand the temples throughout his realm.Although the pharaoh delegated his authority, the performance of temple rituals was still an official duty, restricted to high-ranking priests. The participation of the general populace in most ceremonies was prohibited. Much of the lay religious activity in Egypt instead took place in private and community shrines, separate from the official temples. As the primary link between the human and divine realms, temples attracted considerable veneration from ordinary Egyptians.]Each temple had a principal deity, and most were dedicated to other gods as well.[ Not all deities had temples dedicated to them. Many demons and household gods were involved primarily in magical or private religious practice, with little or no presence in temple ceremonies. There were also other gods who had significant roles in the cosmos but, for uncertain reasons, were not honored with temples of their own.Of those gods who did have temples of their own, many were venerated mainly in certain areas of Egypt, though many gods with a strong local tie were also important across the nation. Even deities whose worship spanned the country were strongly associated with the cities where their chief temples were located. In Egyptian creation myths, the first temple originated as a shelter for a god—which god it was varied according to the city—that stood on the mound of land where the process of creation began. Each temple in Egypt, therefore, was equated with this original temple and with the site of creation itself.[As the primordial home of the god and the mythological location of the city's founding, the temple was seen as the hub of the region, from which the city's patron god ruled over it.Pharaohs also built temples where offerings were made to sustain their spirits in the afterlife, often linked with or located near their tombs. These temples are traditionally called "mortuary temples" and regarded as essentially different from divine temples. The Egyptians did not refer to mortuary temples by any distinct name.]Nor were rituals for the dead and rituals for the gods mutually exclusive; the symbolism surrounding death was present in all Egyptian temples. Economic and administrativeTemples were also key centers of economic activity. The largest of them required prodigious resources and employed tens of thousands of priests, craftsmen, and laborers. The temple's economic workings were analogous to those of a large Egyptian household, with servants dedicated to serving the temple god as they might serve the master of an estate. This similarity is reflected in the Egyptian term for the temple lands and their administration, pr, meaning "house" or "estate".Some of the temple's supplies came from direct donations by the king. In the New Kingdom, when Egypt was an imperial power, these donations often came out of the spoils of the king's military campaigns or the tribute given by his client states.The king might also levy various taxes that went directly to support a temple.[Other revenue came from private individuals, who offered land, slaves, or goods to temples in exchange for a supply of offerings and priestly services to sustain their spirits in the afterlife. #××Ancient Egyptian God AnubisGod of cemeteries and embalming Anubis god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion, usually depicted as a canine or a man with a canine head ( dog or jackal head).Archeologists identified the sacred animal of Anubis as an Egyptian canid, that at the time was called the golden jackal.Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumed different roles in various contexts. Depicted as a protector of graves as early as the First Dynasty (c. 3100 – c. 2890 BC), Anubis was also an embalmer he was replaced by Osiris in his role as lord of theunderworld. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the "Weighing of the Heart," in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead. Despite being one of the most ancient and "one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods" in the Egyptian pantheon, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths.symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming a "jackal" was chosen to protect the dead. The oldest known textual mention of Anubis is in the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom where he is associated with the burial of the pharaoh.the Old Kingdom, Anubis was the most important god of the dead. He was replaced in that role by Osiris during the Middle Kingdom., tomb paintings depict him holding the hand of deceased persons to guide them to Osiris. contrast to real wolves, Anubis was a protector of graves and cemeteries. Several epithets attached to his name in Egyptian texts and inscriptions referred to that role.Khenty-imentiu, which means "foremost of the westerners" and later became the name of adifferent wolf god, alluded to his protecting function because the dead were usually buried on the west bank of the Nile.He took other names in connection with his funerary role, such as "He who is upon his mountain" (tepy-dju-ef) – keeping guard over tombs from above – and "Lord of the sacred land" (neb-ta-djeser), which designates him as a god of the desert necropolis. As "He who is in the place of embalming" (imy-ut), Anubis was associated withmummification. He was also called "He who presides over the god's pavilion" (khanty-she-netjer), in which "pavilion" could be refer either to the place where embalming was carried out, or the pharaoh's burial chamber. One of the roles of Anubis was as the "Guardian of the Scales.The critical scene depicting the weighing of the heart, in theBook of the Dead, shows Anubis performing a measurement that determined whether the person was worthy of entering the realm of the dead (the underworld, known as Duat). By weighing the heart of a deceased person against Ma'at (or "truth"), who was often represented as an ostrich feather, Anubis dictated the fate of souls. Souls heavier than a feather would be devoured by Ammit, and souls lighter than a feather would ascend to a heavenly existence Ancient Egyptian scarab Scarabs were popular amulets andimpression seals in Ancient Egypt. They survive in large numbers and, through their inscriptions and typology, they are an important source of information for archaeologists and historians of the ancient world. They also represent a significant body of ancient art. For reasons that are not clear (although no doubt connected to the religious significance of the Egyptian god Khepri), amulets in the form of scarab beetles had become enormously popular in Ancient Egypt by the early Middle Kingdom (approx. 2000 BCE) and remained popular for the rest of the pharaonic period and beyond. During that long period the function of scarabs repeatedly changed. Primarily amulets, they were also inscribed for use as personal or administrative seals or were incorporated into jewelry. Some scarabs were apparently created for political or diplomatic purposes to commemorate or advertise royal achievements. By the earlyNew Kingdom, heart scarabs had become part of the battery of amulets protectingmummies. From the middle Bronze Age, other ancient peoples of the Mediterranean and the Middle East imported scarabs from Egypt and also produced scarabs in Egyptian or local styles, especially in the Levant. Scarabs (beetles) were produced in vast numbers for many centuries and many thousands have survived. They were generally intended to be worn or carried by the living. They were typically carved or moulded in the form of a scarab beetle with varying degrees of naturalism but usually at least indicating the head, wing case and legs but with a flat base. The base was usually inscribed with designs and/or hieroglyphs to form an impression seal. Scarabs were generally either carved from stone or moulded from Egyptian faience. Once carved, they would typically be glazed blue or green and then fired. The most common stone used for scarabs was a form of steatite, a soft stone which becomes hard when fired (forming enstatite). Hardstone scarabs were also made and the stones most commonly used were green jasper, amethystand carnelian. While the majority of scarabs would originally have been green or blue the coloured glazes, leaving most steatite scarabs appearing white or brown.A scarab was often very light. In ancient Egyptian religion, the sun god Ra is seen to roll across the sky each day, transforming bodies and souls. Beetles of theScarabaeidae family (dung beetle) roll dung into a ball as food and as a brood chamber in which to lay eggs; this way, the larvae hatch and are immediately surrounded by food. For these reasons the scarab was seen as a symbol of this heavenly cycle and of the idea of rebirth or regeneration. The Egyptian godKhepri, Ra as the rising sun, was often depicted as a scarab beetle or as a scarab beetle-headed man. The ancient Egyptians believed that Khepri renewed the sun every day before rolling it above the horizon, then carried it through the other world after sunset, only to renew it, again, the next day. By the end of the First Intermediate Period(about 2055 BCE) scarabs had become extremely common.] They largely replacedcylinder seals and circular "button seals" with simple geometric designs. Throughout the period in which they were made, Scarabs were often engraved with the names of pharaohs and other royal persons. In the Middle Kingdom scarabs were also engraved with the names and titles of officials and used as official seals.From the New Kingdomscarabs bearing the names and titles of officials became rarer, while scarabs bearing the names of gods, often combined with short prayers or mottos, like "With Ra behind there is nothing to fear" became more popular. These "wish" scarabs are often difficult to translate. Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As Shown At picture, Material: BASALT Stone, Provenance: Luxor

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