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Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Stela King Narmer Unifid Crown God Isis1740-1650BC

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Seller: egyptanubis (55) 100%, Location: Cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 153070591199 You Are Bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian stela for pharaoh King Narmer while he is standing between 2 goddess Isis . since during king Narmer reign Egypt was divided into 2 parts lower and Lower Egypt . so king Narmer has unified Egypt also he was first king to unify Egypt. since at right you can see Goddess Isis while wearing crown of upper while on left you can see Goddess Isis while wearing crown of lower Egypt. while they are putting crown of united Egypt over head of king Narmer. since you can find goddess Isis from both sides is putting crown of upper and lower Egypt over the head of king Narmer. since Egypt During king Narmer was divided into 2 parts lower and upper Egypt since king Narmer Has fought and decided to unify Egypt into 1 part. since on right you can see Goddess Isis is wearing Crown of lower egypt while on left wearing crown of lower Egypt since you can see they have unified the crowns of upper and lower Egypt and they have put over head of king Narmer unified crown of upper and lower Egypt. since after godess Isis was goddess of Health wisdom since after king Narmer has fought to unify egypt many soldiers has died so disease has spread in Egypt from dead bodies many diseases was spread so you can see here goddess isis god of health while wearing crown of upper and lower egypt while they are unifying the crowns and putting unified crown over the head of king narmerwhile means they agree for unified Egypt also they will bring health for people and will help the king to bring health to people such stelas were made by ancient egyptians also were taken to grave after deathHeight:21 cmWidth: 15 cm Pharaoh King Narmer Narmer was an ancient Egyptian king of the Early Dynastic Period.He probably was the successor to the Protodynasticking Ka, or possibly Scorpion. Some consider him the unifier of Egypt and founder of the First Dynasty, and in turn the first king of a unified Egypt. Narmer's identity is the subject of ongoing debates, although the dominant opinion among Egyptologists identifies Narmer with the pharaoh Menes, who is renowned in the ancient Egyptian written records as the first king, and the unifier ofAncient Egypt. Narmer's identification with Menes is based on the Narmer Palette (which shows Narmer as the unifier of Egypt) and the two necropolis seals from the Umm el-Qa'abcemetery of Abydos that show him as the first king of the First Dynasty.The date commonly given for the beginning of Narmer’s reign is ca. 3100 BC. Other mainstream estimatings, using both the historical method and Radiocarbon dating, are in the range ca. 3273–2987 BC. The complete spelling of Narmer’s name consists of the hieroglyphs for a catfish (n'r) and a chisel (mr), hence the reading “Narmer” (using the rebus principle). This word is sometimes translated as “raging catfish” .However, there is no consensus on this reading. Other translations include ″angry, fighting, fierceful, painful, furious, bad, evil, biting, menacing″, or "stinging catfish".Some scholars have taken entirely different approaches to reading the name that do not include “catfish” in the name at all, ] but these approaches have not been generally accepted.Rather than incorporating both hieroglyphs, Narmer’s name is often shown in an abbreviated form with just the catfish symbol, sometimes stylized, even, in some cases, represented by just a horizontal line. This simplified spelling appears to be related to the formality of the context. In every case that a serekh is shown on a work of stone, or an official seal impression, it has both symbols. But, in most cases, where the name is shown on a piece of pottery or a rock inscription, just the catfish, or a simplified version of it appears.Two alternative spellings of Narmer’s name have also been found. On a mud sealing from Tarkhan, the symbol for theTjay-bird has been added to the two symbols for ″Narmer″ within the serekh. This has been interpreted as meaning “Narmer the masculine”,]however, according to Ilona Regulski,“The third sign (theTjay-bird) is not an integral part of the royal name since it occurs so infrequently.” suggested that the extra sign is not part of the name, but was put inside the serekh for compositional convenience.In addition, two necropolis seals from Abydos show the name in a unique way: While the chisel is shown conventionally where the catfish would be expected, there is a symbol that has been interpreted by several scholars as an animal skin., it is probably a catfish with a bull’s tail, similar to the image of Narmer on the Narmer Palette in which he is shown wearing a bull’s tail as a symbol of power. Although highly inter-related, the questions of “who was Menes?” and ”who unified Egypt?” are actually two separate issues. Narmer is often credited with the unification of Egypt by means of the conquest of Lower Egypt by Upper Egypt. While Menes is traditionally considered the first king of Ancient Egypt, Narmer has been identified by the majority of Egyptologists as the same person as Menes. Although vigorously debated (Hor-Aha, Narmer’s successor, is the primary alternative identified as Menes by many authorities), the predominant opinion is that Narmer was Menes. The issue is confusing because “Narmer” is a Horus Name, while “Menes” is a personal name (birth name or nisut-bitjname). All of the King Lists which began to appear in the New Kingdom era list the personal names of the kings, and almost all begin with Menes, or begin with divine and/or semi-divine rulers, with Menes as the first “human king”. The difficulty is aligning the contemporary archaeological evidence which lists Horus Names with the King Lists that list personal names.Two documents have been put forward as proof either that Narmer was Menes or alternatively Hor-Aha was Menes. The first is the “Naqada Label” which shows a serekh of Hor-Aha next to an enclosure inside of which are symbols that have been interpreted by some scholars as the name “Menes”. The second is the seal impression from Abydos that alternates between a serekh of Narmer and the chessboard symbol, “mn”, which is interpreted as an abbreviation of Menes. Arguments have been made with regard to each of these documents in favour of Narmer or Hor-Aha being Menes, but in neither case, are the arguments conclusive. Two necropolis sealings, found in in Abydos, in or near the tombs of Den show Narmer as the first king on each list, followed by Hor-Aha. The Qa’a sealing lists all eight of the kings of what scholars now call the First Dynasty in the correct order, starting with Narmer. These necropolis sealings are strong evidence that Narmer was the first king of the First Dynasty – hence is the same person as Menes.Narmer and the unification of EgyptThe Narmer stela that is here shows Narmer wearing the crown of Upper & Lower Egypt on the stela, , giving rise to the theory that Narmer unified the two lands. GODDESS IsisGoddess of health, marriage, and wisdom Isis " is a goddess from thepolytheistic pantheon of Egypt. She was first worshiped in ancient Egyptian religion, and later her worship spread throughout theRoman Empire and the greater Greco-Roman world. Isis is still widely worshiped by manypagans today in diverse religious contexts; including a number of distinct pagan religions, Isis was worshipped as the ideal mother and wife as well as the patroness of nature and magic. She was the friend of slaves, sinners,artisans and the downtrodden, but she also listened to the prayers of the wealthy, maidens, aristocrats and rulers.Isis is often depicted as the mother of Horus, the falcon-headed deity associated with king and kingship . Isis is also known as protector of the dead and goddess of children.The name Isis means "Throne".Her headdress is a throne. As the personification of the throne, she was an important representation of the pharaoh's power. The pharaoh was depicted as her child, who sat on the throne she provided. Her cult was popular throughout Egypt, but her most importanttemples were at Behbeit El Hagar in the Nile delta, and, beginning in the reign withNectanebo I, on the island ofPhilae in Upper Egypt.In the typical form of her myth, Isis was the first daughter of Geb, god of the Earth, andNut, goddess of the Sky, and she was born on the fourth intercalary day. She married her brother, Osiris, and she conceived Horus with him. Isis was instrumental in the resurrection of Osiris when he was murdered by Set. Using her magical skills, she restored his body to life after having gathered the body parts that had been strewn about the earth by Set.This myth became very important during the Greco-Roman period. For example, it was believed that the Nile River flooded every year because of the tears of sorrow which Isis wept for Osiris. Osiris's death and rebirth was relived each year through rituals. The worship of Isis eventually spread throughout the Greco-Roman world, continuing until the suppression of paganism in the Christian era.The popular motif of Isis suckling her son Horus, however, lived on in a Christianized context as the popular image of Mary suckling her infant son Jesus from the fifth century onward. During the Old Kingdom period, Isis was represented as the wife or assistant to the deceased pharaoh. Thus she had a funerary association, her name appearing over eighty times in the pharaoh's funeral texts (thePyramid Texts). This association with the pharaoh's wife is consistent with the role of Isis as the spouse of Horus, the god associated with the pharaoh as his protector, and then later as the deification of the pharaoh himself.But in addition, Isis was also represented as the mother of the "four sons of Horus", the four deities who protected the canopic jarscontaining the pharaoh's internal organs. More specifically, Isis was viewed as the protector of the liver-jar-deity, Imsety. By theMiddle Kingdom period, as the funeral texts began to be used by members of Egyptian society other than the royal family, the role of Isis as protector also grew, to include the protection of nobles and even commoners.By the New Kingdom period, in many places, Isis was more prominent than her spouse. She was seen as the mother of the pharaoh, and was often depicted breastfeeding the pharaoh. It is theorized that this displacement happened through the merging of cults from the various cult centers as Egyptian religion became more standardized.When the cult of Ra rose to prominence, with its cult center at Heliopolis, Ra was identified with the similar deity, Horus. But Hathor had been paired with Ra in some regions, as the mother of the god. Since Isis was paired with Horus, and Horus was identified with Ra, Isis began to be merged with Hathor as Isis-Hathor. By merging with Hathor, Isis became the mother of Horus, as well as his wife. Eventually the mother role displaced the role of spouse. Thus, the role of spouse to Isis was open and in the Heliopolis pantheon, Isis became the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus/Ra. This reconciliation of themes led to the evolution of the myth of Isis and Osiris worship typically took place within anIseum. In Egypt, Isis would have received the same sort of rituals as other Egyptian Deities, including daily offerings. She was served by both priests and priestesses throughout the history of her cult. By the Greco-Roman era, the majority of her priests and priestesses had a reputation for wisdom and healing, and were said to have other special powers, including dream interpretation and the ability to control the weather, which they did by braiding or not combing their hair.he latter was believed because the Egyptians considered knots to have magical powers.The cult of Isis and Osiris continued at Philaeup until the 450s CE, long after the imperial decrees of the late 4th century that ordered the closing of temples to "pagan" gods. Philae was the last major ancient Egyptian temple to be closed. considered the goddess of rebirth and reincarnation, and as a protector of the dead. The Book of the Dead outlines a particular ritual that would protect the dead, enabling travel anywhere in the underworld, and most of the titles Isis holds signify her as the goddess of protection of the dead. was said that Isis tricked Ra into telling her his "secret name" by causing a snake to bite him, the antidote to whose venom only Isis possessed. Knowing his secret name thus gave her power over him. The use of secret names became central in many late Egyptian magic spells. By the late Egyptian historical period, after the occupations by the Greeks and the Romans, Isis became the most important and most powerful deity of the Egyptian pantheon because of her magical skills. Magic is central to the entire mythology of Isis, arguably more so than any other Egyptian deity.Isis had a central role in Egyptian magic spells and ritual, especially those of protection and healing. In many spells her powers are merged with those of her son Horus. His power accompanies hers whenever she is invoked. In Egyptian history the image of a wounded Horus became a standard feature of Isis's healing spells, which typically invoked the curative powers of Isis' milk. Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As shown At pucture, Material: stone, Provenance: luxor

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