See Details on eBay

Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Stela Funeral Boat pharao Crossing Sky 1279–1213BC

$99.00 0 Bids Unsold, $120.00 Shipping, 14-Day Returns

Seller: shaahmabd (57) 100%, Location: cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 142611621130 You Are bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Stela for funeral boat. As you can see After life boat (Funeral boat). Since you can see the Funeral boat while holding king Ramses and his wife queen nefertari and holding many gods god Horus god ptah god osiris while they are flying at the sky . Since funeral boats were used to make dead make journey from his life to the next life which is after life also it was used by the dead pharaoh to cross the sky each day. Since such boats were used dead pharaoh to cross the sky each day with gods. Since it it shows here king Ramses and his wife nefertari while they are showingnstandingbat begining from right & at middle while they are standing, while you can see god horus god of sky is standing at left while shown with head of Falcon and body of human while athis back you can see God Amun standing shown as man wearing crown with 2 flails since god amun was king of gods also he created himself and every thing while his back you can see king Ramses and queen nefertari is shown 2 times while at their back you can see God Osiris while wearing with head of pharaoh distinctive crown while holding crook & flail while at their back you can see again king ramses and his wife queen nefertari while they are standing. Since such funeral boats were very rare alsi such stelas with funeral boats are very rare. Since such funeral boats were used by pharaoh after death to cross the sky also it was used to make journey from our actual life to the other life which is after death . Since you can see pharaoh king ramses while he is crossing the sky with his wife and gods which he used to cross every day. Such stelas were made after king ramses death also was taken to his tombHeight:19 cmWidth:49 cmAncient Egyptian Funeral Boat Ancient Egyptians engaged in some of the most elaborate funeral practices of any great civilization. They tried to provide their dead with everything necessary to complete the journey from this life to the next, and sometimes beyond. The funerary boat is one example of the Egyptian attempt to care for their dead long after death.Boat to the AfterlifeAncient Egyptian funerary boats were once thought to have been used only in the burial of pharaohs. Without more evidence to determine which levels of Egyptian society used the boats, it is up for speculation if the practice was universal or reserved for the elite.Groovy BoatAncient Egyptian funeral boats were crafted of wood imported from elsewhere in the Middle Eastern region also sometimes from stone. Since trees do not grow in the desert, the expense of obtaining the materials to make these boats was great. No nails were used in the construction of the most expertly crafted funeral boats. Instead, rope was used to tie them together in a woven pattern. Grooves were cut into each plank to enable a flush fit for the rope and to prevent leaks. Size and PurposeThe funerary boats measured about 20 feet in length on average. In some cases, these boats could be much larger. The Pharaoh Khufu, who also built the Great Pyramid, was buried with a 144-foot-long funerary boat with 12 oars and a mysterious purpose. Some experts believe it was used to symbolically carry the king's soul to the afterlife, while others believe it was used by the dead pharaoh to cross the sky alongside Ra, the sun god, each day.On BoardRather than a basic hull, the most elaborate of Egyptian funerary boats were built with all the accoutrements necessary to a comfortable journey. The decks were ringed with lattice over which canvas could be stretched to create a sheltered space for rowers. A wooden deck house with a canvas roof sat atop the boat, perhaps as a shelter for the passenger. The oars used to power the boat were cut from solid wood to ensure a strong and lasting finished product.Smaller VersionsFunerary boats did not all live up to the standards of a great pharaoh. Many were small, simple craft with little more than a scooped-out hull and a few oars. In some cases, the construction of a life-size boat was not possible, so model funerary boats were enclosed within the tomb as symbolic gestures. These models had all the detail and significance of the larger versions, but were only a few feet long at best. These boats even contained model rowers, all crafted of wood to ferry the deceased on his way. ###××Ancient Egyptian God Horus God Horus is one of the most significant ancient egyptian deities He was considered to be a celestial falcon, and so his name could be a specific reference to the flight of the falcon, but could also be seen as a more general solar reference. It is thought that the worship of Horus was brought into Egypt during the predynastic period. He was the protector and patron of the pharaoh. As Horus was associated with upper egypt and lower egypt he was the perfect choice for a unified country and it seems that he was considered to be the royal god even before unification took place. The Pharaoh was often considered to be the embodiment of Horus while alive . The most commonly encountered family relationship describes Horus as the son of Isis and Osiris, and he plays a key role in the Osiris myth as Osiris's heir and the rival to Set, the murderer of Osiris. In another tradition Hathor is regarded as his mother and sometimes as his wife.Horus served many functions, most notably being a god of the sky, war and hunting. The Pyramid Texts (c. 2400–2300 BC) describe the nature of the pharaoh in different characters as both Horus and Osiris. The pharaoh as Horus in life became the pharaoh as Osiris in death, where he was united with the rest of the gods. New incarnations of Horus succeeded the deceased pharaoh on earth in the form of new pharaohs The lineage of Horus, the eventual product of unions between the children of Atum, may have been a means to explain and justify pharaonic power. The gods produced by Atum were all representative of cosmic and terrestrial forces in Egyptian life. By identifying Horus as the offspring of these forces, then identifying him with Atum himself, and finally identifying the Pharaoh with Horus, the Pharaoh theologically had dominion over all the world. The notion of Horus as the pharaoh seems to have been superseded by the concept of the pharaoh as the son of Ra during the Fifth Dynasty. Horus was born to the goddess Isis after she retrieved all the dismembered body parts of her murdered husband Osiris, except hispenis, which was thrown into the Nile and eaten by a catfish,] or sometimes depicted as instead by a crab, and according toPlutarch's account used her magic powers to resurrect Osiris and fashion a goldenphallus to conceive her son (older Egyptian accounts have the penis of Osiris surviving). Once Isis knew she was pregnant with Horus, she fled to the Nile Delta marshlands to hide from her brother Set, who jealously killed Osiris and who she knew would want to kill their son. There Isis bore a divine son, Horus. However, seth chose to place Horus´ opposite and enemy set . As a result, that the mythical battle between Horus and set was once a real battle between the followers of Set and the followers of Horus. If this was the case, it would seem that the followers of Horus won as Horus remained a popular emblem of kingship while set was gradually transformed into a symbol of evil. The Pharaoh also had a name (known as the "Golden Horus" name) which was preceded by an image of a sacred hawk on the symbol for gold which specifically linked the Pharaoh to the god. set was the embodiment of disorder and chaos while Horus was the embodiment of order. The Egyptian God Horus was usually depicted as a falcon, . Horus was also said to be a god of war and hunting. The Horus falcon is shown upon a standard on the prehistoric Hunters Palette in the "lion hunt". Thus he became a symbol of majesty and power as well as the model of the pharaohs, who were said to be Horus in human form. Since Horus was said to be the sky, he was considered to also contain the sun and moon.It became said]that the sun was his right eye and the moon his left, and that they traversed the sky when he, a falcon, flew across it. Later, the reason that the moon was not as bright as the sun was explained by a tale, known as the The Contendings of Horus and Seth. In this tale, it was said that Set, the patron of Upper Egypt, and Horus, the patron of Lower Egypt, had battled for Egypt brutally, with neither side victorious, until eventually the gods sided with Horus. As Horus was the ultimate victor he became known as ḥr.w wr "Horus the Great", but more usually translated "Horus the Elder". In the struggle, Set had lost a testicle, explaining why the desert, which Set represented, is infertile. Horus' left eye had also been gouged out, then a new eye was created by part ofKhonsu, the moon god, and was replaced. Horus represented the eclipsing binary Algolin the Calendar of Lucky and Unlucky Days The Eye of Horus is an ancient Egyptian symbol of protection and royal power from deities, in this case from Horus or Ra. The symbol is seen on images of Horus' mother, Isis, and on other deities associated with her. In the Egyptian language, the word for this symbol was "wedjat" (wɟt).It was the eye of one of the earliest of Egyptian deities,Wadjet, who later became associated withBastet, Mut, and Hathor as well. Wadjet was asolar deity and this symbol began as her all-seeing eye. In early artwork, Hathor is also depicted with this eye.Funerary amulets were often made in the shape of the Eye of Horus. The Wedjat "was intended to protect the king in the afterlife"and to ward off evil. Egyptian and Near Eastern sailors would frequently paint the symbol on the bow of their vessel to ensure safe sea travel. Horus was told by his mother, Isis, to protect the people of Egypt from Set, the god of the desert, who had killed Horus' father, Osiris Horus had many battles with Set, not only to avenge his father, but to choose the rightful ruler of Egypt. In these battles, Horus came to be associated with Lower Egypt, and became its patron. According to The Contendings of Horus and Seth, Set is depicted as trying to prove his dominance by seducing Horus and then having sexual intercourse with him. However, Horus places his hand between his thighs and catches Set's semen, then subsequently throws it in the river so that he may not be said to have been inseminated by Set. Horus then deliberately spreads his own semen on some lettuce, which was Set's favorite food. After Set had eaten the lettuce, they went to the gods to try to settle the argument over the rule of Egypt. The gods first listened to Set's claim of dominance over Horus, and call his semen forth, but it answered from the river, invalidating his claim. Then, the gods listened to Horus' claim of having dominated Set, and call his semen forth, and it answered from inside Set many versions of the story, Horus and Set divide the realm between them. This division can be equated with any of several fundamental dualities that the Egyptians saw in their world. Horus may receive the fertile lands around the Nile, the core of Egyptian civilization, in which case Set takes the barren desert or the foreign lands that are associated with it; Horus may rule the earth while Set dwells in the sky; and each god may take one of the two traditional halves of the country, Upper and Lower Egypt, in which case either god may be connected with either region. Yet in the Memphite Theology, Geb, as judge, first apportions the realm between the claimants and then reverses himself, awarding sole control to Horus. In this peaceable union, Horus and Set are reconciled, and the dualities that they represent have been resolved into a united whole. Through this resolution, order is restored after the tumultuous conflict. God Osiris Osiris was an Ancient Egyptian god, usually identified as the god of the afterlife, the underworld, and the dead, but more appropriately as the god of transition, resurrection, and regeneration. He was classically depicted as a green skinned man with a pharaoh's beard, partially mummy-wrapped at his back, wearing a distinctive crown , and holding a symbolic crook and flail. Osiris was at times considered the oldest son of the earth god Geb, though other sources state his father is the sun-god Ra, and the sky goddess Nut, as well as being brother and husband of Isis, with Horus being considered his posthumously begotten son. He was also associated with the epithet Khenti-Amentiu, meaning "Foremost of the Westerners", a reference to his kingship in the land of the dead. As ruler of the dead, Osiris was also sometimes called "king of the living": ancient Egyptians considered the blessed dead "the living ones". Osiris was considered not only a merciful judge of the dead in the afterlife, but also theunderworld agency that granted all life, including sprouting vegetation and the fertile flooding of the Nile River. He was described as the "Lord of love",He Who is Permanently Benign and Youthful" and the"Lord of Silence".The Kings of Egypt were associated with Osiris in death – as Osiris rose from the dead they would, in union with him, inherit eternal life through a process of imitative magic. By the New Kingdom all people, not just pharaohs, were believed to be associated with Osiris at death, if they incurred the costs of the assimilation rituals. Through the hope of new life after death, Osiris began to be associated with the cycles observed in nature, in particular vegetation and the annual flooding of the Nile, through his links with the heliacal rising of Orion andSirius at the start of the new year. Osiris was widely worshipped as Lord of the Dead until the suppression of the Egyptian religionduring the rise of Christianity in the Roman Ancient Egyptians believed that death was in fact transition. They believed that the ka, or life-force, left the body at the point of death and even their practices of preserving the body further indicated their understanding of the continuance of life. Hence, Osiris is known as the God of Transition and also commonly well known as the God of Resurrection and Regeneration God Amum Amun was a majorAncient Egyptian deity. He was attested since the Old Kingdom together with his wifeAmaunet. With the 11th dynasty (c. 21st century BC), he rose to the position of patron deity of Thebes by replacing Monthu. After the rebellion of Thebes against theHyksos and with the rule of Ahmose I (16th century BC), Amun acquired national importance, expressed in his fusion with theSun god, Ra, as Amun-Ra or Amun-Re. Amun-Ra retained chief importance in theEgyptian pantheon throughout the New Kingdom (with the exception of the "Atenist heresy" under Akhenaten). Amun-Ra in this period held the position of transcendental, self-created creator deity "par excellence", he was the champion of the poor or troubled and central to personal piety. His position as King of Gods developed to the point of virtualmonotheism where other gods became manifestations of him. With Osiris, Amun-Ra is the most widely recorded of the Egyptian gods. As the chief deity of the Egyptian Empire, Amun-Ra also came to be worshipped outside of Egypt Amun and Amaunet are mentioned in the Old Egyptian Pyramid Texts. The name Amun(written imn) meant something like "the hidden one" or "invisible". Amun rose to the position of tutelary deity of Thebes after the end of the First Intermediate Period, under the 11th dynasty. As the patron of Thebes, his spouse was Mut. In Thebes, Amun as father, Mut as mother and the Moon god Khonsu formed a divine family or "Theban Triad". When the army of the founder of theEighteenth dynasty expelled the Hyksos rulers from Egypt, the victor's city of origin, Thebes, became the most important city in Egypt, the capital of a new dynasty. The local patron deity of Thebes, Amun, therefore becamenationally important. The pharaohs of that new dynasty attributed all their successful enterprises to Amun, and they lavished much of their wealth and captured spoil on the construction of temples dedicated to Amun. The victory accomplished by pharaohs who worshipped Amun against the "foreign rulers", brought him to be seen as a champion of theless fortunate, upholding the rights of justicefor the poor.By aiding those who traveled in his name, he became the Protector of the road. Since he upheld Ma'at (truth, justice, and goodness), those who prayed to Amun were required first to demonstrate that they were worthy by confessing their sins. "[Amun] who comes at the voice of the poor in distress, who gives breath to him who is wretched..You are Amun, the Lord of the silent, who comes at the voice of the poor; when I call to you in my distress You come and rescue me...Though the servant was disposed to do evil, the Lord is disposed to forgive. The Lord of Thebes spends not a whole day in anger; His wrath passes in a moment; none remains. His breath comes back to us in mercy..May your ka be kind; may you forgive; It shall not happen again." As the cult of Amun grew in importance, Amun became identified with the chief deity who was worshipped in other areas during that period, the sun god Ra. This identification led to another merger of identities, with Amun becoming Amun-Ra. In the Hymn to Amun-Rahe is described as "Lord of truth, father of the gods, maker of men, creator of all animals, Lord of things that are, creator of the staff of life. In the New Kingdom, Amun became successively identified with all other Egyptian deities, to the point of virtual monotheism (which was then attacked by means of the "counter-monotheism" of Atenism). Primarily, the god of wind Amun came to be identified with the solar god Ra and the god of fertility and creation Min, so that Amun-Ra had the main characteristic of a solar god, creator godand fertility god. He also adopted the aspect of the ram from the Nubian solar god, besides numerous other titles and aspects. As Amun-Re he was petitioned for mercy by those who believed suffering had come about as a result of their own or others wrongdoing. Amon-Re "who hears the prayer, who comes at the cry of the poor and distressed...Beware of him! Repeat him to son and daughter, to great and small; relate him to generations of generations who have not yet come into being; relate him to fishes in the deep, to birds in heaven; repeat him to him who does not know him and to him who knows him...Though it may be that the servant is normal in doing wrong, yet the Lord is normal in being merciful. The Lord of Thebes does not spend an entire day angry. As for his anger – in the completion of a moment there is no remnant..As thy Kaendures! thou wilt be merciful!" Ancient Egyptian Pharaoh Ramesses II Ramses the Great, The Pharaoh Who Made Peace with his Enemies And the First Peace Treaty in History.Ramses II", who reigned for 67 years during the 19th dynasty of the 12th century BC, was known as "Ramses the Great". His glories surpassed all other Pharaohs, and Egypt reached an overwhelming state of prosperity during his reign. Not only is he known as one of Egypt's greatest warriors, but also as a peace-maker and for the monuments he left behind all over Egypt. He was the first king in history to sign a peace with his enemies, the hittites, ending long years of wars and hostility. The treaty can still be considered a conclusive model, even when applying todays standards.Ramesses lived to be ninety-six years old, had over 200 wives and concubines, ninety-six sons and sixty daughters, most of whom he outlived. So long was his reign that all of his subjects, when he died, had been born knowing Ramesses as pharaoh and there was widespread panic that the world would end with the death of their king. He had his name and accomplishments inscribed from one end of egypt to the other and there is virtually no ancient site in Egypt which does not make mention of Ramesses the Great. Ramses born c. 1303 BC; died July or August 1213 BC; reigned 1279–1213 BC), also known as Ramesses the Great and Ozymandias, was the third pharaoh of theNineteenth Dynasty of Egypt. He often is regarded as the greatest, most celebrated, and most powerful pharaoh of the Egyptian Empire.His successors and later Egyptians called him the "Great Ancestor". Ramesses II led several military expeditions into theLevant, reasserting Egyptian control overCanaan. He also led expeditions to the south, into Nuria. Early in his life, Ramesses II embarked on numerous campaigns to restore possession of previously held territories lost to theNubians and Hittites and to secure Egypt's borders. He also was responsible for suppressing some Nubian revolts and carrying out a campaign in Libya. Although the Battle of Kadesh often dominates the scholarly view of the military prowess and power of Ramesses II, he nevertheless, enjoyed more than a few outright victories over the enemies of Egypt. During Ramesses II's reign, the Egyptian army is estimated to have totaled about 100,000 men; a formidable force that he used to strengthen Egyptian influence. In his second year, Ramesses II decisively defeated the Sherden sea pirates who were wreaking havoc along Egypt's Mediterranean coast by attacking cargo-laden vessels travelling the sea routes to Egypt. The Sherden people probably came from the coast of Ionia, from southwest Anatolia or perhaps, also from the island of Sardinia.Ramesses posted troops and ships at strategic points along the coast and patiently allowed the pirates to attack their perceived prey before skillfully catching them by surprise in a sea battle and capturing them all in a single action. The Battle of Kadesh in his fifth regnal year was the climactic engagement in a campaign that Ramesses fought in Syria, against the resurgent Hittite forces of Muwatallis. The pharaoh wanted a victory at Kadesh both to expand Egypt's frontiers into Syria, and to emulate his father Seti I's triumphal entry into the city just a decade or so earlier. He also constructed his new capital, Pi-Ramesses. There he built factories to manufacture weapons, chariots, and shields, supposedly producing some 1,000 weapons in a week, about 250 chariots in two weeks, and 1,000 shields in a week and a half. After these preparations, Ramesses moved to attack territory in the Levant, which belonged to a more substantial enemy than any he had ever faced in war: the Hittite Empire. Egypt's sphere of influence was now restricted to Canaan while Syria fell into Hittite hands. Canaanite princes, seemingly encouraged by the Egyptian incapacity to impose their will and goaded on by the Hittites, began revolts against Egypt. In the seventh year of his reign, Ramesses II returned to Syria once again. This time he proved more successful against his Hittite foes. During this campaign he split his army into two forces. One force was led by his son,Amun-her-khepeshef, and it chased warriors of the Šhasu tribes across the Negev as far as the Dead Sea, capturing Edom-Seir. It then marched on to capture Moab. The other force, led by Ramesses, attacked Jerusalem andJericho. He, too, then entered Moab, where he rejoined his son. The reunited army then marched on Hesbon, Damascus, on to Kumidi, and finally, recaptured Upi (the land around Damascus), reestablishing Egypt's former sphere of influence Ramesses extended his military successes in his eighth and ninth years. He crossed the Dog River (Nahr al-Kalb) and pushed north into Amurru. His armies managed to march as far north as Dapur,where he had a statue of him erected. The Egyptian pharaoh thus found himself in northern Amurru, well pastKadesh, in Tunip, where no Egyptian soldier had been seen since the time of Thutmose III, almost 120 years earlier. He laid siege to the city before capturing it. His victory proved to be ephemeral. In year nine. After having reasserted his power over Canaan, Ramesses led his army north. The thin strip of territory pinched between Amurru and Kadesh did not make for a stable possession. Within a year, they had returned to the Hittite fold, so that Ramesses had to march against Dapur once more in his tenth year. This time he claimed to have fought the battle without even bothering to put on his corslet, until two hours after the fighting began. Six of Ramesses's youthful sons, still wearing their side locks, took part in this conquest. He took towns in Retenu,and Tunip in Naharin, later recorded on the walls of the Ramesseum. This second success at the location was equally as meaningless as his first, as neither power could decisively defeat the other in battle The peace treaty The deposed Hittite king, Mursili III, fled to Egypt, the land of his country's enemy, after the failure of his plots to oust his uncle from the throne. Hattusili III responded by demanding that Ramesses II extradite his nephew back to Hatti. This demand precipitated a crisis in relations between Egypt and Hatti when Ramesses denied any knowledge of Mursili's whereabouts in his country, and the two empires came dangerously close to war. Eventually, in the twenty-first year of his reign (1258 BC), Ramesses decided to conclude an agreement with the new Hittite king, Hattusili III, at Kadesh to end the conflict. The ensuing document is the earliest knownpeace treaty in world history The peace treaty was recorded in two versions, one in Egyptian hieroglyphs, the other in Akkadian, using cuneiform script; both versions survive. Such dual-language recording is common to many subsequent treaties. This treaty differs from others, in that the two language versions are differently worded. While the majority of text is identical, the Hittite version says the Egyptians came suing for peace, however, the Egyptian version says the reverse. The treaty was given to the Egyptians in the form of a silver plaque, and this "pocket-book" version was taken back to Egypt and carved into the Temple of Karnak. The treaty was concluded between Ramesses II and Hattusili III in year 21 of Ramesses's reign (c. 1258 BC). Its 18 articles call for peace between Egypt and Hatti and then proceeds to maintain that their respective deities also demand peace. The frontiers are not laid down in this treaty, but may be inferred from other documents. The Anastasy A papyrus describes Canaan during the latter part of the reign of Ramesses II and enumerates and names the Phoeniciancoastal towns under Egyptian control. The harbour town of Sumur, north of Byblos, is mentioned as the northern-most town belonging to Egypt, suggesting it contained an Egyptian garrison. No further Egyptian campaigns in Canaan are mentioned after the conclusion of the peace treaty. The northern border seems to have been safe and quiet, so the rule of the pharaoh was strong until Ramesses II's death, and the waning of the dynasty. When the King of Mira attempted to involve Ramesses in a hostile act against the Hittites, the Egyptian responded that the times of intrigue in support of Mursili III, had passed. Hattusili III wrote to Kadashman-Enlil II, King of Karduniash (Babylon) in the same spirit, reminding him of the time when his father, Kadashman-Turgu, had offered to fight Ramesses II, the king of Egypt. The Hittite king encouraged the Babylonian to oppose another enemy, which must have been the king of Assyria, whose allies had killed the messenger of the Egyptian king. Hattusili encouraged Kadashman-Enlil to come to his aid and prevent the Assyrians from cutting the link between the Canaanite province of Egypt and Mursili III, the ally of Ramesses. Ramesses II also campaigned south of thefirst cataract into Nubia. When Ramesses was about 22, two of his own sons, includingAmun-her-khepeshef, accompanied him in at least one of those campaigns. By the time of Ramesses, Nubia had been a colony for two hundred years, but its conquest was recalled in decoration from the temples Ramesses II There are no detailed accounts of Ramesses II's undertaking large military actions against the Libyans, only generalised records of his conquering and crushing them, which may or may not refer to specific events that were otherwise unrecorded. Queen Nefertari Nefertari, also known as Nefertari Meritmut, was an Egyptian queen and the first of theGreat Royal Wives (or principal wives) ofRamesses the Great. Nefertari means 'beautiful companion' and Meritmut means 'Beloved of [the goddess] Mut'. She is one of the best known Egyptian queens, next toCleopatra, Nefertiti and Hatshepsut. She was highly educated and able to both read and write hieroglyphs, a very rare skill at the time. She used these skills in her diplomatic work, corresponding with other prominent royalties of the time. Nefertari held many different titles, including: Great of Praises (wrt-hzwt), Sweet of Love (bnrt-mrwt), Lady of Grace (nbt-im3t), Great King’s Wife (hmt-niswt-wrt), his beloved (hmt-niswt-wrt meryt.f), Lady of The Two Lands (nbt-t3wy), Lady of all Lands (hnwt-t3w-nbw), Wife of the Strong Bull (hmt-k3-nxt), god’s Wife (hmt-ntr), Mistress of Upper and Lower Egypt (hnwt-Shm’w-mhw).Ramesses II also named her 'The one for whom the sun shin Nefertari married Ramesses II before he ascended the throne.Nefertari had at least four sons and two daughters. Amun-her-khepeshef, the eldest was Crown Prince and Commander of the Troops, and Pareherwenemef would later serve in Ramesses II’s army. Prince Meryatumwas elevated to the position of High Priest of Re in Heliopolis. Inscriptions mention he was a son of Nefertari. Prince Meryre is a fourth son .Meritamen andHenuttawy are two royal daughters. Nefertari first appears as the wife ofRamesses II in official scenes during the first year of Ramesses II. Nefertari is depicted behind her husband as he elevates Nebwenenef to the position of High Priests of Amun during a visit to Abydos. Nefertari also appears in a scene next to a year 1 stela. She is depicted shaking two sistra before Taweret, Thoth and Nut.Nefertari is an important presence in the scenes from Luxor and Karnak. In a scene from Luxor, Nefertari appears leading the royal children. Another scene shows Nefertari at the Festival of the Mast of Amun-Min-Kamephis. The king and the queen are said to worship in the temple and are shown overseeing the Erection of the Mast before Amen-Re attended by standard bearers. Nefertari’s speech during this ceremony is recorded:"Your beloved son, the Lord of Both Lands, Usermaatre Setepenre, has come to see you in your beautiful manifestation. He has erected for you the mast of the (pavilion)-framework. May you grant him eternity as King, and victory over those rebellious (against) His Majesty.Nefertari appears as Ramesses II’s consort on many statues in both Luxor and Karnak. In Western Thebes, Nefertari is mentioned on a statuary group from Deir el-BAhari, a stela and blocks from Deir el-Medina.The greatest honor was bestowed on Nefertari however in Abu Simbel. Nefertari is depicted in statue form at the great temple, but the small temple is dedicated to Nefertari and the goddess Hathor. The building project was started earlier in the reign of Ramesses II, Nefertari’s prominence at court is further supported by cuneiform tablets from theHittite city of Hattusas), containing Nefertari's correspondence with the king Hattusili III and his wife Puduhepa. She is mentioned in the letters as Naptera. Nefertari is known to have sent gifts to Puduhepa:The great Queen Naptera of the land of Egypt speaks thus: Speak to my sister Puduhepa, the Great Queen of the Hatti land. I, your sister, (also) be well!! May your country be well. Now, I have learned that you, my sister, have written to me asking after my health. ... You have written to me because of the good friendship and brotherly relationship between your brother, the king of Egypt, The Great and the Storm god will bring about peace, and he will make the brotherly relationship between the Egptian king, the Great King, and his brother, the Hatti King, the Great King, last for ever... See, I have sent you a gift, in order to greet you, my sister... for your neck (a necklace) of pure gold, composed of 12 bands and weighing 88 shekels, coloured linen maklalu-material, for one royal dress for the king... A total of 12 linen garments.Nefertari is shown at the inaugural festivities at Abu Simbel in year 24. Her daughterMeritamen is depicted taking part in place of her mother in some of the scenes. Nefertari may well have been in failing health at this point. Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As shown at picture, Provenance: Luxor, Material: Stone

PicClick Insights PicClick Exclusive
  •  Popularity - 44 views, 3.1 views per day, 14 days on eBay. High amount of views. 0 Sold, 1 Available.
  •  Price -
  •  Seller - Over 57 items sold. 0% negative feedback. Top-Rated Seller! Ships on time with tracking, 0 problems with past sales.
People Also Loved