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Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Statue pharao Menkaure God Hathor&Isis 2560-2499BC

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Seller: shaahmabd (57) 100%, Location: cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 142611630499 You Are bidding on Rare Antiwue Ancient Egyptian statue pharaoh Menkaure while he is standinding at middle between 2 goddess while wearing his crown. While at left of statue you can see Goddess Hathor shown as women wearing sun disk while at right you can seegoddess Isis shown as women standing. While at back of statue you can see part of the Book of the dead while Gods are walking putting Laws for humans on earth also laws for the other world while written some inscriptions by hiroglyphic about these Laws on earth and after life. It is written who will feed Poor we will forgive him who will not steal or kill his spirit will be free after life. As you can see the 3 statues King Menkaure and Goddess Isis & Hathor were covered with water of Gold. Since king pharaoh Menkaure was son of Khafra and his successor he build the small pyramid at Giza. He build the small pyramid at Giza since there are 3 pyramids at Giza he has the smallest pyramid at giza. Since you can see at middle king Menkaure at middle while at his left goddess Hathor which was Goddess of Joy Dance Love music which was making the king happy with music love while you can see at right Goddess Isis which was God of Health she always bring Health to the King. It shows that king Menkaure was worshipping goddess Hathor to bring him joy and happy after ling days of wirk and worship goddess Isis to bring him health while at back there is part of Book of dead to learn people about laws that gods put it for humans and after death to learn people about laws about earth which Gods put . Such statues they used to put at castles of king also put next to temples also they put at governement offices also was taken to the grave after the king was death Height:27 cmWeight:16 cm ####××××Pharaoh Menkaure Menkaure was an ancient Egyptian king (pharaoh) of the 4th dynasty during the Old Kingdom, . he was the throne successor of king Khafre. Menkaure became famous as he was builder of the small Pyramid of Menkaure, at Giza. Menkaure was the son of Khafra and the grandson of Khufu . Khafra was father of Menkaure. Menkaure is thought to have had at least two wives. As her ruled Egypt for 62 years. Menkaure's pyramid at Giza was called Netjer-er-Menkaure which means "Menkaure is Divine". This pyramid is the smallest of the three pyramids at Giza. This pyramid measures 103.4 meters at the base and 65.5 meters in height. Menkaure was a benevolent ruler, unlike eitherKhufu or Khafre. Menkare reopened the temples and allowed the people, who were ground down to the lowest point of misery, to return to their occupations and to resume the practice of sacrifice". However, the Gods had apparently decreed that Egypt should suffer tyranny for one hundred and fifty years and did not approve of his gentle ways. The oracle at Buto warned him that he would only reign for six more years so he filled each day with drinking and merriment, never pausing to sleep, and so extended his life by 63 years instead of six. Evidence from his reign would support the suggestion that he was a beneficent ruler Menkaure also decreed that the children of officials were educated along with the royal children. He built his pyramid at Giza which he named "Menkaure is divine". His pyramid complex included a satellite pyramid for his wife Khamerernebty II ##Goddess Hathor Goddess of the sky, dance, love, beauty, joy, motherhood, foreign lands, mining, music and fertility. Hathor is an Ancient Egyptian goddess who personified the principles of joy, feminine love, and motherhood.She was one of the most important and popular deities throughout the history of Ancient Egypt. Hathor was worshipped by royalty and common people alike. In tomb paintings, she is often depicted as "Mistress of the West," welcoming the dead into the next life. In other roles, she was a goddess of music, dance, foreign lands, andfertility. She was believed to assist women in childbirth. She was also believed to be the patron goddess of miners.The cult of Hathor predates the historic period, and the roots of devotion to her are therefore difficult to trace, though it may be a development of predynastic cults which venerated fertility, and nature in general, represented by cows.Hathor is commonly depicted as a cow goddess with horns in which is set a sun disk with Uraeus. Twin feathers are also sometimes shown in later periods as well as amenat necklace. Hathor may be the cow goddess who is depicted from an early date on the Narmer Palette and on a stone urn dating from the 1st dynasty that suggests a role as sky-goddess and a relationship to Horus who, as a sun god, is "housed" in her.The Ancient Egyptians viewed reality as multi-layered in which deities who merge for various reasons, while retaining divergent attributes and myths, were not seen as contradictory but complementary.In a complicated relationship Hathor is at times the mother, daughter and wife of Ra and, likeIsis, is at times described as the mother of Horus, and associated with Bast.The cult of Osiris promised eternal life to those deemed morally worthy. Originally the justified dead, male or female, became an Osiris but by early Roman times females became identified with Hathor and men with osiris. Hathor is ambiguously depicted until the fourth dynasty.As In the historical era Hathor is shown using the imagery of a cow deity. Artifacts from pre-dynastic times depict cow deities using the same symbolism as used later time for hathorA cow deity appears on the belt of the King on the Narmer Palette dated to the pre-dynastic era, and this is Hathor or, in another guise, . The evidence pointing to the deity being Hathor in particular is based on a passage from thePyramid texts which states that the King's apron comes from Hathor.A stone urn recovered from Hierakonpolis and dated to the first dynasty has on its rim the face of a cow deity with stars on its ears and horns that may relate to Hathor's role as a sky-goddess. Another artifact from the first dynasty shows a cow lying down on an ivory engraving with the inscription "Hathor in the Marshes" indicating her association with vegetation and the papyrus marsh in particular. From the Old Kingdom she was also called Lady of the Sycamore in her capacity as a tree deity. Hathor had a complex relationship with Ra. At times she is the eye of Ra and considered his daughter, but she is also considered Ra's mother. She absorbed this role from another cow goddess Mehet-Weret ("Great flood") who was the mother of Ra in a creation myth and carried him between her horns. As a mother she gave birth to Ra each morning on the eastern horizon and as wife she conceives through union with him each day.Hathor, along with the goddess Nut, was associated with the Milky Way during the third millennium B.C. when, during the fall and spring equinoxes, it aligned over and touched the earth where the sun rose and fell.] The four legs of the celestial cow represented Nut or Hathor could, in one account, be seen as the pillars on which the sky was supported with the stars on their bellies constituting the Milky Way on which the solar barque of Ra, representing the sun, sailed The Milky Way was seen as a waterway in the heavens, sailed upon by both the sun deity and the moon, leading the ancient Egyptiansto describe it as The Nile in the Sky.Hathor also was favoured as a protector in desert regions AsSerabit el-Khadim was where turquoise was mined, Hathor's titles included "Lady of Turquoise", "Mistress of Turquoise", and "Lady of Turquoise Country".[Hathor's identity as a cow perhaps depicted as such on the Narmer Palette, meant that she became identified with another ancient cow-goddess of fertility, Bat.The assimilation of Bat, who was associated with the sistrum, a musical instrument, brought with it an association with music. In this later form, Hathor's cult became centred in Dendera in Upper Egypt and it was led by priestesses and priests who also were dancers, singers and other dieties The Book of the Heavenly Cow states that while Ra was ruling the earth, humans began plotting against him. Ra sent Hathor, in the form of the warlike goddess Sekhmet, to destroy them. Hathor (as Sekhmet) became bloodthirsty and the slaughter was great because she could not be stopped. As the slaughter continued, Ra saw the chaos down below and decided to stop the blood-thirsty goddess. So he poured huge quantities of blood-coloured beer on the ground to trick Sekhmet. She drank so much of it—thinking it to be blood—that she became drunk and returned to her former gentle self as Hathor. GODDESS IsisGoddess of health, marriage, and wisdom Isis " is a goddess from thepolytheistic pantheon of Egypt. She was first worshiped in ancient Egyptian religion, and later her worship spread throughout theRoman Empire and the greater Greco-Roman world. Isis is still widely worshiped by manypagans today in diverse religious contexts; including a number of distinct pagan religions, Isis was worshipped as the ideal mother and wife as well as the patroness of nature and magic. She was the friend of slaves, sinners,artisans and the downtrodden, but she also listened to the prayers of the wealthy, maidens, aristocrats and rulers.Isis is often depicted as the mother of Horus, the falcon-headed deity associated with king and kingship . Isis is also known as protector of the dead and goddess of children.The name Isis means "Throne".Her headdress is a throne. As the personification of the throne, she was an important representation of the pharaoh's power. The pharaoh was depicted as her child, who sat on the throne she provided. Her cult was popular throughout Egypt, but her most importanttemples were at Behbeit El Hagar in the Nile delta, and, beginning in the reign withNectanebo I, on the island ofPhilae in Upper Egypt.In the typical form of her myth, Isis was the first daughter of Geb, god of the Earth, andNut, goddess of the Sky, and she was born on the fourth intercalary day. She married her brother, Osiris, and she conceived Horus with him. Isis was instrumental in the resurrection of Osiris when he was murdered by Set. Using her magical skills, she restored his body to life after having gathered the body parts that had been strewn about the earth by Set.This myth became very important during the Greco-Roman period. For example, it was believed that the Nile River flooded every year because of the tears of sorrow which Isis wept for Osiris. Osiris's death and rebirth was relived each year through rituals. The worship of Isis eventually spread throughout the Greco-Roman world, continuing until the suppression of paganism in the Christian era.The popular motif of Isis suckling her son Horus, however, lived on in a Christianized context as the popular image of Mary suckling her infant son Jesus from the fifth century onward. During the Old Kingdom period, Isis was represented as the wife or assistant to the deceased pharaoh. Thus she had a funerary association, her name appearing over eighty times in the pharaoh's funeral texts (thePyramid Texts). This association with the pharaoh's wife is consistent with the role of Isis as the spouse of Horus, the god associated with the pharaoh as his protector, and then later as the deification of the pharaoh himself.But in addition, Isis was also represented as the mother of the "four sons of Horus", the four deities who protected the canopic jarscontaining the pharaoh's internal organs. More specifically, Isis was viewed as the protector of the liver-jar-deity, Imsety. By theMiddle Kingdom period, as the funeral texts began to be used by members of Egyptian society other than the royal family, the role of Isis as protector also grew, to include the protection of nobles and even commoners.By the New Kingdom period, in many places, Isis was more prominent than her spouse. She was seen as the mother of the pharaoh, and was often depicted breastfeeding the pharaoh. It is theorized that this displacement happened through the merging of cults from the various cult centers as Egyptian religion became more standardized.When the cult of Ra rose to prominence, with its cult center at Heliopolis, Ra was identified with the similar deity, Horus. But Hathor had been paired with Ra in some regions, as the mother of the god. Since Isis was paired with Horus, and Horus was identified with Ra, Isis began to be merged with Hathor as Isis-Hathor. By merging with Hathor, Isis became the mother of Horus, as well as his wife. Eventually the mother role displaced the role of spouse. Thus, the role of spouse to Isis was open and in the Heliopolis pantheon, Isis became the wife of Osiris and the mother of Horus/Ra. This reconciliation of themes led to the evolution of the myth of Isis and Osiris worship typically took place within anIseum. In Egypt, Isis would have received the same sort of rituals as other Egyptian Deities, including daily offerings. She was served by both priests and priestesses throughout the history of her cult. By the Greco-Roman era, the majority of her priests and priestesses had a reputation for wisdom and healing, and were said to have other special powers, including dream interpretation and the ability to control the weather, which they did by braiding or not combing their hair.he latter was believed because the Egyptians considered knots to have magical powers.The cult of Isis and Osiris continued at Philaeup until the 450s CE, long after the imperial decrees of the late 4th century that ordered the closing of temples to "pagan" gods. Philae was the last major ancient Egyptian temple to be closed. considered the goddess of rebirth and reincarnation, and as a protector of the dead. The Book of the Dead outlines a particular ritual that would protect the dead, enabling travel anywhere in the underworld, and most of the titles Isis holds signify her as the goddess of protection of the dead. was said that Isis tricked Ra into telling her his "secret name" by causing a snake to bite him, the antidote to whose venom only Isis possessed. Knowing his secret name thus gave her power over him. The use of secret names became central in many late Egyptian magic spells. By the late Egyptian historical period, after the occupations by the Greeks and the Romans, Isis became the most important and most powerful deity of the Egyptian pantheon because of her magical skills. Magic is central to the entire mythology of Isis, arguably more so than any other Egyptian deity.Isis had a central role in Egyptian magic spells and ritual, especially those of protection and healing. In many spells her powers are merged with those of her son Horus. His power accompanies hers whenever she is invoked. In Egyptian history the image of a wounded Horus became a standard feature of Isis's healing spells, which typically invoked the curative powers of Isis' milk. Book of dead Book of the Dead is an ancient Egyptian funerary text, used from the beginning of theNew Kingdom (around 1550 BCE) to around 50 BCE. The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of textsconsisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The original Egyptian name for the text, transliterated rw nw prt m hrw,] is translated as Book of Coming Forth by Day.Another translation would be Book of Emerging Forth into the Light. "Book" is the closest term to describe the loose collection of texts consisting of a number of magic spells intended to assist a dead person's journey through the Duat, or underworld, and into the afterlife and written by many priests over a period of about 1000 years.The Book of the Dead was part of a tradition of funerary texts which includes the earlierPyramid Texts and Coffin Texts, which were painted onto objects, not papyrus. Some of the spells included were drawn from these older works and date to the 3rd millennium BCE. Other spells were composed later in Egyptian history, dating to the Third Intermediate Period (11th to 7th centuries BCE). A number of the spells which made up the Book continued to be inscribed on tomb walls and sarcophagi, as had always been the spells from which they originated. The Book of the Dead was placed in the coffin or burial chamber of the deceased.There was no single or canonical Book of the Dead. The surviving papyri contain a varying selection of religious and magical texts and vary considerably in their illustration. Some people seem to have commissioned their own copies of the Book of the Dead, perhaps choosing the spells they thought most vital in their own progression to the afterlife. TheBook of the Dead was most commonly written in hieroglyphic or hieratic script on a papyrusscroll, and often illustrated with vignettesdepicting the deceased and their journey into the afterlife. The Book of the Dead is made up of a number of individual texts and their accompanying illustrations. Most sub-texts begin with the word ro, which can mean mouth, speech, a chapter of a book, spell, utterance, or incantation. This ambiguity reflects the similarity in Egyptian thought between ritual speech and magical power. In the context of the Book of the Dead, it is typically translated as either "chapter" or "spell". In this article, the word "spell" is used.At present, some 192 spells are known,[]though no single manuscript contains them all. They served a range of purposes. Some are intended to give the deceased mystical knowledge in the afterlife, or perhaps to identify them with the gods: for instance, Spell 17, is an obscure and lengthy description of the god Atum.Others are incantations to ensure the different elements of the dead person's being were preserved and reunited, and to give the deceased control over the world around him. Still others protect the deceased from various hostile forces, or guide him through the underworld past various obstacles. Famously, two spells also deal with the judgement of the deceased in theWeighing of the Heart ritual.Such spells as 26-30, and sometimes spells 6 and 126 relate to the heart, and were inscribed on scarabs.The texts and images of the Book of the Deadwere magical as well as religious. Magic was as legitimate an activity as praying to the gods, even when the magic was aimed at controlling the gods themselves.[] Indeed, there was little distinction for the Ancient Egyptians between magical and religious practice.The concept of magic (heka) was also intimately linked with the spoken and written word. The act of speaking a ritual formula was an act of creation;there is a sense in which action and speech were one and the same thing.] The magical power of words extended to the written word. Hieroglyphic script was held to have been invented by the god Thoth, and the hieroglyphs themselves were powerful. Written words conveyed the full force of a spell.This was even true when the text was abbreviated or omitted, as often occurred in later Book of the Dead scrolls, particularly if the accompanying images were present.The Egyptians also believed that knowing the name of something gave power over it; thus, the Book of the Dead equips its owner with the mystical names of many of the entities he would encounter in the afterlife, giving him power over them.The spells of the Book of the Dead made use of several magical techniques which can also be seen in other areas of Egyptian life. A number of spells are for magical amulets, which would protect the deceased from harm. In addition to being represented on a Book of the Dead papyrus, these spells appeared on amulets wound into the wrappings of a mummy.Everyday magic made use of amulets in huge numbers. Other items in direct contact with the body in the tomb, such as headrests, were also considered to have amuletic value.A number of spells also refer to Egyptian beliefs about the magical healing power of such book. He has to confront a formidable array of gods: Bone-Crusher, Shining-Tooth, Blood-Consumer, Flint-Eyes, Entrail-Consumer ]and many others with less frightening names assembled here from many places all over Egypt. He declares himself innocent of wrong-doing towards the gods and his fellow men. These protestations of guiltlessness of trespasses against society and cultic rules remained remarkably unchanged during the course of history. They, and similar passages in the Instructions literature, are accepted as being the standard of ancient Egyptian ethical behaviour. The writing down of these declarations and the knowledge of the gods' names was powerful magic, forcing the gods to accept his protestations of innocence, above all when they were repeated:I am pure.I am pure.I am pure.I am pure. The scales are topped by Maat, goddess of Justice, Truth and Order, wearing a feather on her head. Ammut, Devourer of the Dead, whose... forepart is like that of a crocodile, the middle of her body is like that of a lion, her hind quarters are like those of a hippopotamusThe Papyrus of Ani from the description of the beast Am-mitis ready to destroy the deceased if his heart should be full of sin and consequently too heavy. The deceased, well aware that he has not led a life as completely blameless as one might have hoped, implores his heart not to give him away, reminds it that their fate is intertwined, promises bliss in the hereafter, and even appeals to its altruism: a judge is happiest when his decision is favourable to the deceased.O my heart of my being!Do not rise up against me as witness,Do not oppose me in the tribunal,Do not rebel against me before the guardian of the scales!You are my ka within my body,The Khnum who prospers my limbs.Go to the good place prepared for us,Do not make my name stink before them,The magistrates who put people in their places!If it's good for us it's good for the judge,It pleases him who renders judgment.Do not invent lies before the god,Before the great god, the lord of the west,Lo, your uprightness brings vindication!The Papyrus of Ani A jar containing the heart is placed on one of the pans, while the other is weighed down by the feather of Maat. Anubis does the weighing, giving the scales a nudge in the right direction with the ankh. Thoth, god of wisdom who had given mankind the hieroglyphs, writes down the decision. Just as the Egyptians in this world liked to document everything, so did their gods in the next."Come," says Thoth, "why have you come?""I have come and I press forward so that I may be announced.""What now is your condition?""I am purified from evil things, I am protected from the evil deeds of those who live in their days: I am not among them.""Now I will announce you. But who is he whose heaven is fire, whose walls are cobras, and whose floor is a stream of water? Who is he, I say?""He is Osiris.""Come forward, then, you will be announced to him. Your cakes will come from the Eye of Ra, your beer from the Eye, your meals of the dead from the Eye. This has been decreed for the Osiris the overseer of the house of the overseer of the seal, Nu, triumphant." Horus leads the way, holding an ankh. The deceased follows him freely to meet Osiris, with whom he will be identified as one of his followers.His heart is righteous, and it hath come forth from the Balance; it hath not sinned against any god or any goddess. Thoth hath weighed it according to the decree pronounced unto him by the Company of the Gods, and it is most true and righteous. Grant thou that cakes and ale may be given unto him, and let him appear in the presence of the god Osiris, and let him be like into the Followers of Horus for ever and ever. He is received by the god of the Duat, the Realm of the Dead, and his two sisters, Isis and Nephthys. The four sons of Horus stand on a lotus flower growing out of the waters over which stands the throne of Osiris Behold, I am in thy presence, O Lord of Amentet (the West). There is no sin in my body. I have not spoken that which is not true knowingly, nor have I done anything with a false heart. Grant thou that I may be like unto those favoured ones who are in thy following, and that I may be an Osiris greatly favoured of the beautiful god, and beloved of the Lord of the Two Lands, I who am a veritable royal scribe who loveth thee, Ani, whose word is true before the god Osiris. And now begins the dangerous journey of the new Osiris through the Underworld. Thanks to the Opening of the Mouth ceremony he is capable to utter the spells necessary to complete his journeyBehold, I will gather together to myself this charm from the person with whom it is [and from the place] wherein it is [and it shall come to me] quicker than a greyhound, and swifter than light. Hail, thou who bringest the Ferry-Boat of Ra, thou holdest thy course firmly and directly in the north wind as thou sailest up the river towards the Island of Fire which is in Khert-Neter (the necropolis, i.e. the realm of the dead). Behold, thou shalt gather together to thee this charm from wheresoever it may be, and from whomsoever it may be with [and it shall come to me] quicker than a greyhound, and swifter than light. It (the charm) made the transformations of Mut; it fashioned the gods [or] kept them silent; by it Mut gave the warmth [of life] to the gods. Behold, these words of power are mine, and they shall come unto me from wheresoever they may be, or with whomsoever they may be, quicker than greyhounds and swifter than light. Paymet- We accept paypal shipmen- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As shown at pucture, Provenance: Luxor, Material: Stone

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