Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Malachite Stone Queen Hatchepsut Head 1478–1458 BC

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Seller: egyptanubis (58) 100%, Location: Cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 153090619515 You Are Bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian Malachite Stone Ancient Egyptian Statue Queen Pharaoh Hatshepsut while she is standing while she is wearing Royal Crown while she is Holding the head of her enemey after she has killed her while Holding Ushabti while down on Her Leg there is Scarab . since it shows queen Hatshepsut while standing while Holding Head of Her Enemey while there is Scarab Down. since king Thutmose II was married to many wives when he died when he died suddenely there wives were competing and fighting between them who will reign Egypt and her son . Since tge wives of king King Thutmose were fighting after his death who will reign Egypt and their sons since was married to Queen Hatchepsut & Queen Iset. so it seems that after kings death Hathchepsut & Queen Iset were fighting after they closed the doors of the castle while it shows Queen Hatchepsut has killes queen Iset & Cut her body and Holding Queen Iset Head and going to throw her head infront of the castle that Queen Iset has been Killed and queen Hatchepsut is the new queen and king pharaoh after her husband death while there is Scarab down which used to bring luck for queen Hatchepsut . while queen Hatshepsut is Holding statue for queen Iset which was inside the Castle which will throw queen Iset statues outside the castle with her head . the statue is Malachite stone it shows queen Hatchepsut after Strong fight with Queen Iset after queen Iset has been Killed and her head were cut . such statues were made by queen Hatchepsut tk record the day she has killed her enemey on throne of Egypt and has killed her also was taken to grave after deathHeight:36 cmWidth:9 cm Queen Hatshepsut daughter of King Thutmose I, Hatshepsut became queen of Egypt when she married her half-brother, Thutmose II, around the age of 12. Upon his death, she began acting as regent for her stepson, the infant Thutmose III, but later took on the full powers of a pharaoh, becoming co-ruler of Egypt around 1473 B.C. As pharaoh, Hatshepsut extended Egyptian trade and oversaw ambitious building projects, most notably the Temple of Deir el-Bahri, located in western Thebes, where she would be buried. Depicted (at her own orders) as a male in many contemporary images and sculptures, Hatshepsut remained largely unknown to scholars until the 19th century.HATSHEPSUT’S RISE TO POWERHatshepsut was the elder of two daughters born to Thutmose I and his queen, Ahmes. After her father’s death, 12-year-old Hatshepsut became queen of Egypt when she married her half-brother Thutmose II, the son of her father and one of his secondary wives, who inherited his father’s throne around 1492 B.C. They had one daughter, Neferure. Thutmose II died young, around 1479 B.C., and the throne went to his infant son, also born to a secondary wife. According to custom, Hatshepsut began acting as Thutmose III’s regent, handling affairs of state until her stepson came of age.Did You Know?Hatshepsut was only the third woman to become pharaoh in 3,000 years of ancient Egyptian history, and the first to attain the full power of the position. Cleopatra, who also exercised such power, would rule some 14 centuries later.After less than seven years, however, Hatshepsut took the unprecedented step of assuming the title and full powers of a pharaoh herself, becoming co-ruler of Egypt with Thutmose III. Though past Egyptologists held that it was merely the queen’s ambition that drove her, more recent scholars have suggested that the move might have been due to a political crisis, such as a threat from another branch of the royal family, and that Hatshepsut may have been acting to save the throne for her stepson.HATSHEPSUT AS PHARAOHKnowing that her power grab was highly controversial, Hatshepsut fought to defend its legitimacy, pointing to her royal lineage and claiming that her father had appointed her his successor. She sought to reinvent her image, and in statues and paintings of that time, she ordered that she be portrayed as a male pharaoh, with a beard and large muscles. In other images, however, she appeared in traditional female regalia. Hatshepsut surrounded herself with supporters in key positions in government, including Senenmut, her chief minister. Some have suggested Senenmut might also have been Hatshepsut’s lover, but little evidence exists to support this claim.As pharaoh, Hatshepsut undertook ambitious building projects, particularly in the area around Thebes. Her greatest achievement was the enormous memorial temple at Deir el-Bahri, considered one of the architectural wonders of ancient Egypt. Another great achievement of her reign was a trading expedition she authorized that brought back vast riches–including ivory, ebony, gold, leopard skins and incense–to Egypt from a distant land known as Punt (possibly modern-day Eritrea).HATSHEPSUT’S DEATH AND LEGACYHatshepsut probably died around 1458 B.C., when she would have been in her mid-40s. She was buried in the Valley of the Kings, located in the hills behind Deir el-Bahri. In another effort to legitimize her reign, she had her father’s sarcophagus reburied in her tomb so they could lie together in death. Thutmose III went on to rule for 30 more years, proving to be both an ambitious builder like his stepmother and a great warrior. Late in his reign, Thutmose III had almost all of the evidence of Hatshepsut’s rule–including the images of her as king on the temples and monuments she had built–eradicated, possibly to erase her example as a powerful female ruler. Ancient Egyptian scarab Scarabs were popular amulets andimpression seals in Ancient Egypt. They survive in large numbers and, through their inscriptions and typology, they are an important source of information for archaeologists and historians of the ancient world. They also represent a significant body of ancient art. For reasons that are not clear (although no doubt connected to the religious significance of the Egyptian god Khepri), amulets in the form of scarab beetles had become enormously popular in Ancient Egypt by the early Middle Kingdom (approx. 2000 BCE) and remained popular for the rest of the pharaonic period and beyond. During that long period the function of scarabs repeatedly changed. Primarily amulets, they were also inscribed for use as personal or administrative seals or were incorporated into jewelry. Some scarabs were apparently created for political or diplomatic purposes to commemorate or advertise royal achievements. By the earlyNew Kingdom, heart scarabs had become part of the battery of amulets protectingmummies. From the middle Bronze Age, other ancient peoples of the Mediterranean and the Middle East imported scarabs from Egypt and also produced scarabs in Egyptian or local styles, especially in the Levant. Scarabs (beetles) were produced in vast numbers for many centuries and many thousands have survived. They were generally intended to be worn or carried by the living. They were typically carved or moulded in the form of a scarab beetle with varying degrees of naturalism but usually at least indicating the head, wing case and legs but with a flat base. The base was usually inscribed with designs and/or hieroglyphs to form an impression seal. Scarabs were generally either carved from stone or moulded from Egyptian faience. Once carved, they would typically be glazed blue or green and then fired. The most common stone used for scarabs was a form of steatite, a soft stone which becomes hard when fired (forming enstatite). Hardstone scarabs were also made and the stones most commonly used were green jasper, amethystand carnelian. While the majority of scarabs would originally have been green or blue the coloured glazes, leaving most steatite scarabs appearing white or brown.A scarab was often very light. In ancient Egyptian religion, the sun god Ra is seen to roll across the sky each day, transforming bodies and souls. Beetles of theScarabaeidae family (dung beetle) roll dung into a ball as food and as a brood chamber in which to lay eggs; this way, the larvae hatch and are immediately surrounded by food. For these reasons the scarab was seen as a symbol of this heavenly cycle and of the idea of rebirth or regeneration. The Egyptian godKhepri, Ra as the rising sun, was often depicted as a scarab beetle or as a scarab beetle-headed man. The ancient Egyptians believed that Khepri renewed the sun every day before rolling it above the horizon, then carried it through the other world after sunset, only to renew it, again, the next day. By the end of the First Intermediate Period(about 2055 BCE) scarabs had become extremely common.] They largely replacedcylinder seals and circular "button seals" with simple geometric designs. Throughout the period in which they were made, Scarabs were often engraved with the names of pharaohs and other royal persons. In the Middle Kingdom scarabs were also engraved with the names and titles of officials and used as official seals.From the New Kingdomscarabs bearing the names and titles of officials became rarer, while scarabs bearing the names of gods, often combined with short prayers or mottos, like "With Ra behind there is nothing to fear" became more popular. These "wish" scarabs are often difficult to translate. Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As shown At pucture, Material: Malachite Stone, Provenance: Luxor

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