Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian 5Statues Gods Anubis Amun Horus priest2160-2080BC

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Seller: egyptanubis (58) 100%, Location: Cairo, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 153059713031 You Are Bidding on Rare Antique Ancient Egyptian 5 statues from left 1st God Anubis with Jackal head then 2nd God Horus with falcon head and body of human then 3rd God Amun shown As pharaoh with crowned while 4th is Ancient Egyptian priest then 5th is God Anubis with Jackal Head . since these is some statues which were worshipped by Ancient Egyptians also they were used as Amulets. since you can see on the left God Anubis is shown as jackal head and body of human since God Anubis was God of embalming under world cemetries. while 2nd is God Horus is shown with falcon head he was god of protection sky he used to fight evil and choas also he was god of sky also god of unification . 3rd you can see God Amun is shown as pharaoh crowned since god amun was thinked to be father of gods who has created earth even he has created evey thing even created earth and all humans even they thoughtbhe give birth. while 4th is ancient Egyptian Priest which was very important at Ancient Egyptians also his work was to serve gods clean arround them to offer them sacrifice while 5th is God Anubis which is god of cemetries embalming mummification. such statues were made by ancient Egyptians to worship it also they were used as amulets for protection also was taken to grave after death Height:10 cmwidth: 4 cm××Ancient Egyptian God AnubisGod of cemeteries and embalming Anubis god associated with mummification and the afterlife in ancient Egyptian religion, usually depicted as a canine or a man with a canine head ( dog or jackal head).Archeologists identified the sacred animal of Anubis as an Egyptian canid, that at the time was called the golden jackal.Like many ancient Egyptian deities, Anubis assumed different roles in various contexts. Depicted as a protector of graves as early as the First Dynasty (c. 3100 – c. 2890 BC), Anubis was also an embalmer he was replaced by Osiris in his role as lord of theunderworld. One of his prominent roles was as a god who ushered souls into the afterlife. He attended the weighing scale during the "Weighing of the Heart," in which it was determined whether a soul would be allowed to enter the realm of the dead. Despite being one of the most ancient and "one of the most frequently depicted and mentioned gods" in the Egyptian pantheon, Anubis played almost no role in Egyptian myths.symbolized both rebirth and the discoloration of the corpse after embalming a "jackal" was chosen to protect the dead. The oldest known textual mention of Anubis is in the Pyramid Texts of the Old Kingdom where he is associated with the burial of the pharaoh.the Old Kingdom, Anubis was the most important god of the dead. He was replaced in that role by Osiris during the Middle Kingdom., tomb paintings depict him holding the hand of deceased persons to guide them to Osiris. contrast to real wolves, Anubis was a protector of graves and cemeteries. Several epithets attached to his name in Egyptian texts and inscriptions referred to that role.Khenty-imentiu, which means "foremost of the westerners" and later became the name of adifferent wolf god, alluded to his protecting function because the dead were usually buried on the west bank of the Nile.He took other names in connection with his funerary role, such as "He who is upon his mountain" (tepy-dju-ef) – keeping guard over tombs from above – and "Lord of the sacred land" (neb-ta-djeser), which designates him as a god of the desert necropolis. As "He who is in the place of embalming" (imy-ut), Anubis was associated withmummification. He was also called "He who presides over the god's pavilion" (khanty-she-netjer), in which "pavilion" could be refer either to the place where embalming was carried out, or the pharaoh's burial chamber. One of the roles of Anubis was as the "Guardian of the Scales.The critical scene depicting the weighing of the heart, in theBook of the Dead, shows Anubis performing a measurement that determined whether the person was worthy of entering the realm of the dead (the underworld, known as Duat). By weighing the heart of a deceased person against Ma'at (or "truth"), who was often represented as an ostrich feather, Anubis dictated the fate of souls. Souls heavier than a feather would be devoured by Ammit, and souls lighter than a feather would ascend to a heavenly existence #××Ancient Egyptian God Horus God Horus is one of the most significant ancient egyptian deities He was considered to be a celestial falcon, and so his name could be a specific reference to the flight of the falcon, but could also be seen as a more general solar reference. It is thought that the worship of Horus was brought into Egypt during the predynastic period. He was the protector and patron of the pharaoh. As Horus was associated with upper egypt and lower egypt he was the perfect choice for a unified country and it seems that he was considered to be the royal god even before unification took place. The Pharaoh was often considered to be the embodiment of Horus while alive . The most commonly encountered family relationship describes Horus as the son of Isis and Osiris, and he plays a key role in the Osiris myth as Osiris's heir and the rival to Set, the murderer of Osiris. In another tradition Hathor is regarded as his mother and sometimes as his wife.Horus served many functions, most notably being a god of the sky, war and hunting. The Pyramid Texts (c. 2400–2300 BC) describe the nature of the pharaoh in different characters as both Horus and Osiris. The pharaoh as Horus in life became the pharaoh as Osiris in death, where he was united with the rest of the gods. New incarnations of Horus succeeded the deceased pharaoh on earth in the form of new pharaohs The lineage of Horus, the eventual product of unions between the children of Atum, may have been a means to explain and justify pharaonic power. The gods produced by Atum were all representative of cosmic and terrestrial forces in Egyptian life. By identifying Horus as the offspring of these forces, then identifying him with Atum himself, and finally identifying the Pharaoh with Horus, the Pharaoh theologically had dominion over all the world. The notion of Horus as the pharaoh seems to have been superseded by the concept of the pharaoh as the son of Ra during the Fifth Dynasty. Horus was born to the goddess Isis after she retrieved all the dismembered body parts of her murdered husband Osiris, except hispenis, which was thrown into the Nile and eaten by a catfish,] or sometimes depicted as instead by a crab, and according toPlutarch's account used her magic powers to resurrect Osiris and fashion a goldenphallus to conceive her son (older Egyptian accounts have the penis of Osiris surviving). Once Isis knew she was pregnant with Horus, she fled to the Nile Delta marshlands to hide from her brother Set, who jealously killed Osiris and who she knew would want to kill their son. There Isis bore a divine son, Horus. However, seth chose to place Horus´ opposite and enemy set . As a result, that the mythical battle between Horus and set was once a real battle between the followers of Set and the followers of Horus. If this was the case, it would seem that the followers of Horus won as Horus remained a popular emblem of kingship while set was gradually transformed into a symbol of evil. The Pharaoh also had a name (known as the "Golden Horus" name) which was preceded by an image of a sacred hawk on the symbol for gold which specifically linked the Pharaoh to the god. set was the embodiment of disorder and chaos while Horus was the embodiment of order. The Egyptian God Horus was usually depicted as a falcon, . Horus was also said to be a god of war and hunting. The Horus falcon is shown upon a standard on the prehistoric Hunters Palette in the "lion hunt". Thus he became a symbol of majesty and power as well as the model of the pharaohs, who were said to be Horus in human form. Since Horus was said to be god of the sky, he was considered to also contain the sun and moon.It became said]that the sun was his right eye and the moon his left, and that they traversed the sky when he, a falcon, flew across it. Later, the reason that the moon was not as bright as the sun was explained by a tale, known as the The Contendings of Horus and Seth. In this tale, it was said that Set, the patron of Upper Egypt, and Horus, the patron of Lower Egypt, had battled for Egypt brutally, with neither side victorious, until eventually the gods sided with Horus. As Horus was the ultimate victor he became known as ḥr.w wr "Horus the Great", but more usually translated "Horus the Elder". In the struggle, Set had lost a testicle, explaining why the desert, which Set represented, is infertile. Horus' left eye had also been gouged out, then a new eye was created by part ofKhonsu, the moon god, and was replaced. Horus represented the eclipsing binary Algolin the Calendar of Lucky and Unlucky Days The Eye of Horus is an ancient Egyptian symbol of protection and royal power from deities, in this case from Horus or Ra. The symbol is seen on images of Horus' mother, Isis, and on other deities associated with her. In the Egyptian language, the word for this symbol was "wedjat" (wɟt).It was the eye of one of the earliest of Egyptian deities,Wadjet, who later became associated withBastet, Mut, and Hathor as well. Wadjet was asolar deity and this symbol began as her all-seeing eye. In early artwork, Hathor is also depicted with this eye.Funerary amulets were often made in the shape of the Eye of Horus. The Wedjat "was intended to protect the king in the afterlife"and to ward off evil. Egyptian and Near Eastern sailors would frequently paint the symbol on the bow of their vessel to ensure safe sea travel. Horus was told by his mother, Isis, to protect the people of Egypt from Set, the god of the desert, who had killed Horus' father, Osiris Horus had many battles with Set, not only to avenge his father, but to choose the rightful ruler of Egypt. In these battles, Horus came to be associated with Lower Egypt, and became its patron. According to The Contendings of Horus and Seth, Set is depicted as trying to prove his dominance by seducing Horus and then having sexual intercourse with him. However, Horus places his hand between his thighs and catches Set's semen, then subsequently throws it in the river so that he may not be said to have been inseminated by Set. Horus then deliberately spreads his own semen on some lettuce, which was Set's favorite food. After Set had eaten the lettuce, they went to the gods to try to settle the argument over the rule of Egypt. The gods first listened to Set's claim of dominance over Horus, and call his semen forth, but it answered from the river, invalidating his claim. Then, the gods listened to Horus' claim of having dominated Set, and call his semen forth, and it answered from inside Set many versions of the story, Horus and Set divide the realm between them. This division can be equated with any of several fundamental dualities that the Egyptians saw in their world. Horus may receive the fertile lands around the Nile, the core of Egyptian civilization, in which case Set takes the barren desert or the foreign lands that are associated with it; Horus may rule the earth while Set dwells in the sky; and each god may take one of the two traditional halves of the country, Upper and Lower Egypt, in which case either god may be connected with either region. Yet in the Memphite Theology, Geb, as judge, first apportions the realm between the claimants and then reverses himself, awarding sole control to Horus. In this peaceable union, Horus and Set are reconciled, and the dualities that they represent have been resolved into a united whole. Through this resolution, order is restored after the tumultuous conflict God Amum Amun was a majorAncient Egyptian deity. He was attested since the Old Kingdom together with his wifeAmaunet. With the 11th dynasty (c. 21st century BC), he rose to the position of patron deity of Thebes by replacing Monthu. After the rebellion of Thebes against theHyksos and with the rule of Ahmose I (16th century BC), Amun acquired national importance, expressed in his fusion with theSun god, Ra, as Amun-Ra or Amun-Re. Amun-Ra retained chief importance in theEgyptian pantheon throughout the New Kingdom (with the exception of the "Atenist heresy" under Akhenaten). Amun-Ra in this period held the position of transcendental, self-created creator deity "par excellence", he was the champion of the poor or troubled and central to personal piety. His position as King of Gods developed to the point of virtualmonotheism where other gods became manifestations of him. With Osiris, Amun-Ra is the most widely recorded of the Egyptian gods. As the chief deity of the Egyptian Empire, Amun-Ra also came to be worshipped outside of Egypt Amun and Amaunet are mentioned in the Old Egyptian Pyramid Texts. The name Amun(written imn) meant something like "the hidden one" or "invisible". Amun rose to the position of tutelary deity of Thebes after the end of the First Intermediate Period, under the 11th dynasty. As the patron of Thebes, his spouse was Mut. In Thebes, Amun as father, Mut as mother and the Moon god Khonsu formed a divine family or "Theban Triad". When the army of the founder of theEighteenth dynasty expelled the Hyksos rulers from Egypt, the victor's city of origin, Thebes, became the most important city in Egypt, the capital of a new dynasty. The local patron deity of Thebes, Amun, therefore becamenationally important. The pharaohs of that new dynasty attributed all their successful enterprises to Amun, and they lavished much of their wealth and captured spoil on the construction of temples dedicated to Amun. The victory accomplished by pharaohs who worshipped Amun against the "foreign rulers", brought him to be seen as a champion of theless fortunate, upholding the rights of justicefor the poor.By aiding those who traveled in his name, he became the Protector of the road. Since he upheld Ma'at (truth, justice, and goodness), those who prayed to Amun were required first to demonstrate that they were worthy by confessing their sins. "[Amun] who comes at the voice of the poor in distress, who gives breath to him who is wretched..You are Amun, the Lord of the silent, who comes at the voice of the poor; when I call to you in my distress You come and rescue me...Though the servant was disposed to do evil, the Lord is disposed to forgive. The Lord of Thebes spends not a whole day in anger; His wrath passes in a moment; none remains. His breath comes back to us in mercy..May your ka be kind; may you forgive; It shall not happen again." As the cult of Amun grew in importance, Amun became identified with the chief deity who was worshipped in other areas during that period, the sun god Ra. This identification led to another merger of identities, with Amun becoming Amun-Ra. In the Hymn to Amun-Rahe is described as "Lord of truth, father of the gods, maker of men, creator of all animals, Lord of things that are, creator of the staff of life. In the New Kingdom, Amun became successively identified with all other Egyptian deities, to the point of virtual monotheism (which was then attacked by means of the "counter-monotheism" of Atenism). Primarily, the god of wind Amun came to be identified with the solar god Ra and the god of fertility and creation Min, so that Amun-Ra had the main characteristic of a solar god, creator godand fertility god. He also adopted the aspect of the ram from the Nubian solar god, besides numerous other titles and aspects. As Amun-Re he was petitioned for mercy by those who believed suffering had come about as a result of their own or others wrongdoing. Amon-Re "who hears the prayer, who comes at the cry of the poor and distressed...Beware of him! Repeat him to son and daughter, to great and small; relate him to generations of generations who have not yet come into being; relate him to fishes in the deep, to birds in heaven; repeat him to him who does not know him and to him who knows him...Though it may be that the servant is normal in doing wrong, yet the Lord is normal in being merciful. The Lord of Thebes does not spend an entire day angry. As for his anger – in the completion of a moment there is no remnant..As thy Kaendures! thou wilt be merciful Priest in Ancient Egypt The role of the priest was very important in Egyptian Society. The Egyptians believed the gods lived in the temples. Only the priest was allowed to enter the sacred area of the temple and approach the statue representing the god or goddess. The people could pray at the gate or in the court to the Pharaoh who acted as a go-between the people and the gods. priests role was to care for the needs of the god/goddess. They have no role to oversee or care for the people of Egypt. They did not try to educate the people on the religion or look after their morals. priest would care for the god in the following ways:In the morning, the high priest breaks the seal, lights a torch to walk the god, says prayers, lights incense, washes the statue (which may be solid gold), places fresh clothing and jewels on it and places offerings of food and drink near it. Singers offer hymns of praise to the god. At the end of the day, the priest backs out of the shrine, sweeping away his footprints as he goes, and seals the sacred area again. The Egyptians believed the priest played a vital role in providing for the needs of the gods. If their duties were neglected, it was believed problems would arise. Due to the importance of their role for the society, the priest were well compensated. For much of Egyptian history, there was no class of full-time professional priests." . Many of the priest were classified as lay priest A lay priest is part-time and would hold another job often in a position in the state or local governments. The lay priests were especially common in small communities. Lay priests served on a rotation system. Normally, there were four equally staffed groups of lay priests. Each group would serve for a month and then return to their other occupation for three months. New priests were often chosen by the Pharaoh. Often, the Pharaoh would choose relatives to fill positions in the most powerful and influential temples. Many of the positions of priests were hereditary and remained as an inheritance in certain families. The Pharaoh would have the power to transfer or promote a priest the majority of the time. At times, they may have been selected by committee a of priests. Priests had certain requirements to meet while they were "on duty." They were only allowed to wear linens or clothing made of plants. Articles of clothing that were made from animals were not permitted. They were required to shave their heads and bodies daily. Cold water baths were taken several times a day. They had to practice sexual abstinence while performing their duties at the temple. Paymet- We accept paypal shipment- takes from 14 days or 21 days after shipment may be less- we will ship after 5 days from payment-We ship world wide condition-As you can see in picture returns- we refund you money after you return the peice Condition: As shown At picture, Material: stone, Provenance: luxor

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