Rare Ancient Egypt Serket Goddess Of Protection Egyptian Antique Scorpion Statue Egypt Antiquity Amazing Amulet Scorpion Goddess Faience

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Seller: rare-antiques (72) 98.6%, Location: luxor, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 192784704861 Rare Ancient Egypt Serket Goddess Of Protection Egyptian Antique Scorpion Statuesize : 7 x 6.5 cm Historical Overview About This Faience : Scorpion stings lead to paralysis and Serket's name describes this, as it means "(she who) tightens the throat", however, Serket's name also can be read as meaning "(she who) causes the throat to breathe", and so, as well as being seen as stinging the unrighteous, Serket was seen as one who could cure scorpion stings and the effects of other venoms such as snakebite. In the art of ancient Egypt, Serket was shown as a scorpion (a symbol found on the earliest artifacts of the culture such as from Naqada III) or, as a woman with a scorpion on her head. Although Serket does not appear to have had any temples, she had a sizable number of priests in many communities. One of the most dangerous species of scorpion, the Deathstalker (Leiurus quinquestriatus) resides in North Africa, and its sting may kill, so Serket was considered a highly important goddess, and sometimes she was considered by pharaohs to be their patron. Her close association with the early rulers implies that she was their protector, notably Scorpion I and Scorpion II. As the protector against venom and snakebite, Serket often was said to protect the deities from Apep, the great snake-demon of evil, sometimes being depicted as the guard when Apep was captured. As many of the venomous creatures of Egypt could prove fatal, Serket also was considered a protector of the dead, particularly being associated with venoms and fluids causing stiffening. She was thus said to be the protector of the tents of embalmers, and of the canopic jar associated with venom—the jar of the intestine—which was deified later as Qebehsenuef, one of the four sons of Horus, who were her sons by one of the two Horuses (Heru-pa-khered (Horus the Younger) or Her-ur (Horus the Elder)). As the guard of one of the canopic jars and a protector, Serket gained a strong association with Neith, Isis, and Nephthys, who also performed similar functions. Eventually, Serket began to be identified with Isis, sharing imagery and parentage, until finally, Serket became said to be merely an aspect of Isis, whose cult had become very dominant. Our Policy : We Are Following All Policies Of EBAY . All Our Items Are Fully Guaranteed , So Bid Confidently . We Offer You Full Refund In One Week After Delivery , In Case You Are Not Satisfied With It . We only Accept PayPal Right Now .All items listed by Rare-Antiques Are A family Heritage For A well-known Family In Egypt used To Work In excavation Works at The Egyptian Desert Until 1970s . Please Contact Us If You Have Any Question Or Need Help ! . Before Leaving Neutral Feedback Or Negative One , Give Us Chance To Fix Any Problem As We Will DO Anything To Make You Happy ! . Condition: excellent, Material: Porcelain, Provenance: valley of the kings

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