Radio Show: Timothy White Rock Stars The Eddie Money Nobody Knows 4/24/89

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Seller: Top-Rated Plus Seller mkwagner (6,753) 100%, Location: Paisley, Florida, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 302219374168 WELCOME TO KEITH'S KOLLECTABLES, EBAY'S PREMIER PLACE FOR GREAT RADIO SHOWS FROM ALL GENRES OF MUSIC.PLEASE REMEMBER THAT IF YOU BUY ANY FIVE ITEMS OR MORE FROM MY STORE EBAY WILL DISCOUNT EACH ITEM BY 20% AT CHECKOUT. THIS IS THE LEAST I CAN DO FOR FELLOW COLLECTOR FRIENDS WHO CHERISH A GREAT DEAL JUST AS I DO.SO HERE IS THE BIG QUESTION: WHAT IS A RADIO SHOW? WHY COLLECT THEM? WHERE DO THEY COME FROM? Well, those are good questions, especially if you have never known of them. Radio Shows are syndicated productions by one of several large and small distributors who supply broadcast product to radio stations normally during weekends when the usual air personalities have a break. Many air on Saturday or Sunday evenings or during overnight segments. They often feature some of the best known voices for their genre from across the country thus the Dick Clark's and Casey Kasem's and Rick Dees and Dick Bartley and so many others. People collect them for various reasons. Some just collect the series because they like it and want them all. Some collect their favorite artists or genre of music. Rather than an album by the artist or a compilation bought at Wal Mart or downloaded through iTunes or wherever, they have a unique presentation of their favorite artist or music not available anywhere else and always with dj presentations which were very entertaining. Some collect interviews with their favorite artists as most shows had interview segments. Some collect commercials especially old car commercials but certainly not limited to only those. AND, these shows are in limited quantity. They were pressed just for syndicated stations in the United States. Many have just a few still in circulation. Some of the more popular shows may have as many as a few hundred of each week's show that survived but think about it. A few hundred for some 200 million Americans and millions of overseas collectors who look for unique presentations of their favorite artists or form of music is about as rare as rare can be. Also, many if not most stations tossed them away after airing since the shows could not be aired again due to the time oriented commercial contentSo there may be fairly few left.Which makes them increasingly hard to find. They were first distributed on reel to reel tape if the show goes back that far into the 60's, then later on lp, later on CD and even later on CDR. Now they are not available at all to collectors since they are distributed by digital download much like you get your music from iTunes. These shows become rarer and rarer every day because the people who buy them hold on to them and the people who sell them, like me, are running out of them. My best contact for these shows is running very low and when he is gone I will be at the mercy of finding a good deal here and there but never from a regular source. The shows that you get now and hold on to will never decrease in value and only increase. I have prided myself since the start to provide the best and fairest cost with a no holds barred guarantee that you will be happy or I refund your money. I sell them for near what I bought them for. I give volume discounts and discount postage always. As the postal service increases their rates, my shipping rates over the years has decreased. And, I have one of the biggest radio show libraries in the world consisting of over ten thousand shows, so many that I don't even know all that I have and am sometimes amazed when I go to look for one show and find another that I did not realize I had. Finally, it is Americana at its best. Whether the show be from the 60's or 2000's, rock, countdown, oldies, country, classical, religious, jazz or big band, it is unique and home grown. And you just can't find them anywhere. Even record stores that still exist will rarely have any. Radio shows are wonderful representations of the real golden age of radio at least music wise. And every one you buy is an original, not a copy, not a remake - all are limited editions in the hundreds at most and most much less. Once you get hooked, like me, it is a love affair for life! Welcome to the Club! Here is another great show for you from the ONE OF THE BEST SPECIAL LIMITED SERIES ROCK SHOWS OF ALL TIME, TIMOTHY WHITE'S ROCK STARS. AND ON BEAUTIFUL VIRGIN VINYL FROM 28 YEARS AGO. TIMOTHY WHITE (January 25, 1952 – June 27, 2002) was a noted American rock music journalist and editor.White began his journalism career as a writer for the Associated Press, but soon gravitated towards music writing. He was an editor for the rock magazine Crawdaddy! in the late 1970s and a senior editor for Rolling Stone magazine in the early 1980s, where he wrote a ground-breaking article detailing the destruction of Bob Hope's face in a logging accident when Hope was in his teens, accounting for Hope's unusual nose and jaw. White was editor-in-chief of Billboard from 1991 until his death at age 50 of a heart attack in 2002.White wrote several music-related biographies, including books on The Beach Boys, Bob Marley and James Taylor, as well as several collections of columns and short pieces.He also hosted and co-produced a nationally syndicated radio series, "Timothy White's Rock Stars/The Timothy White Sessions".[2]Sometimes eccentric in appearance (he often sported bow ties at concerts), White seemed an unlikely rock writer but was well respected for his honest, meticulously documented, and lively writing.White was also the subject of a lyric by Eminem, in which he raps: "Let me recite 'til Timothy White, pickets outside the Interscope offices every night." This lyric appears in the song "Bitch Please II" featuring Xzibit, Dr. Dre, Nate Dogg, and Snoop Dogg.Timothy White, Billboard editor in chief since 1991, died suddenly of an apparent heart attack June 27, just as the magazine was going to press. He was 50. Timothy collapsed in an elevator in the Billboard offices at 770 Broadway in New York and was rushed to St. Vincent's Hospital, where he succumbed. Timothy is survived by his wife Judy Garlan, his 10-year-old twins Christopher and Alexander, and seven siblings.Born on Jan. 25, 1952, in Paterson, N.J., to John Alexander and Gloria White, Timothy had a boundless passion for music and its creators that filled the pages of Billboard. During his 11 years at the magazine, he brought many innovative changes, including the birth of the Century Award, Billboard's highest honor, which was annually bestowed upon an artist for creative achievement. Adamant that Billboard cover not only the most acclaimed or famous artists, Timothy always saved room in its pages for new acts about whom he or staffers expressed enthusiasm, often giving them equal footing with industry giants. Among the columns intended to champion artists outside of the mainstream that were created during Timothy's time at Billboard are Continental Drift, dedicated to unsigned artists, and Heatseekers, which highlights acts that have never appeared in the top half of The Billboard 200.He regularly wrote about un-sung artists in his column, Music to My Ears, and was a fearless advocate of artists' rights. He often served as the industry's moral compass by tackling controversial music-business issues."The first hire I made as publisher of Billboard in 1990 was Timothy," Billboard publisher Howard Lander says. "I needed a partner to help transform this venerable publication to better serve the music industry as it began a journey through a decade of enormous change. Besides possessing an inquisitive mind, a deep passion for music, and unmatched writing skills, Timothy led his life with the firm belief that a person had to be willing to stand up and be counted. I will forever be grateful for his companionship, courage, and friendship. We used to end most conversations with the simple phrase 'Words & Music.'"Screenwriter Mitch Glazer, Timothy's best friend since 1976 when they worked together at Crawdaddy, had lunch with Timothy minutes before his death. "He was in great spirits and was anticipating his 15th wedding anniversary, which was June 28," Glazer says. "He was the most present, alive person at the peak of his game. His last words were to my 16-year-old daughter, Shane, who was anxious about going away to Bennington College for a month. He said: 'You're going to be great,' and he started to leave. He came back, hugged her, and said, 'Rock on' and walked away. I think that's a perfect epitaph."Timothy came to Billboard with a distinguished journalistic legacy. He started his career as a copyboy, sports, and entertainment writer for the Associated Press in 1972, after graduating from Fordham University. He was managing editor and then senior editor of seminal music magazine Crawdaddy from 1976-1978. He served as associate editor and later senior editor at Rolling Stone from 1978-1982, where he interviewed such legends as Johnny Carson and Mike Wallace, as well as hundreds of musical artists.Timothy was also the author of several books, including "Catch a Fire" -- an award-winning biography of Bob Marley -- and acclaimed biographies on the Beach Boys ("The Nearest Faraway Place: Brian Wilson, the Beach Boys, and the Southern California Experience") and James Taylor ("Long Ago and Far Away: James Taylor, His Life and Music"), as well as a collection of his Billboard essays titled "Music to My Ears" (his final column, filed just an hour before his death, appears in the July 6 issue of Billboard. It will be posted later this afternoon on Billboard.com).He was awarded four prestigious ASCAP-Deems Taylor Awards for his book "Rock Lives: Profiles & Interviews," for his Music to My Ears columns, for his 1993 Century Award Portrait of the Artist profile of George Harrison, and in 2001 for his editing of Billboard's series on work for hire and musical copyrights written by Bill Holland.He was host/co-producer of "Timothy White's Rock Stars/The Timothy White Sessions," an award-winning nationally syndicated radio series.Like many journalists and frustrated musicians, White even drummed in a band, the Dry Heaves, for many years. The group included fellow writers Jann Wenner, Charles M. Young, Jon Pareles, and Kurt Loder.White's office walls at Billboard were decorated with plaques and notes from artists he had supported, thanking him for his commitment to them and their artistry. Perhaps the most fitting send-off for Timothy comes from Angelique Kidjo, who wrote, "May your soul keep on singing." HERE IS HIS OBITUARY PUBLISHED IN BILLBOARD MAGAZINETimothy White, Billboard editor in chief since 1991, died suddenly of an apparent heart attack June 27, just as the magazine was going to press. He was 50. Timothy collapsed in an elevator in the Billboard offices at 770 Broadway in New York and was rushed to St. Vincent's Hospital, where he succumbed. Timothy is survived by his wife Judy Garlan, his 10-year-old twins Christopher and Alexander, and seven siblings.Born on Jan. 25, 1952, in Paterson, N.J., to John Alexander and Gloria White, Timothy had a boundless passion for music and its creators that filled the pages of Billboard. During his 11 years at the magazine, he brought many innovative changes, including the birth of the Century Award, Billboard's highest honor, which was annually bestowed upon an artist for creative achievement. Adamant that Billboard cover not only the most acclaimed or famous artists, Timothy always saved room in its pages for new acts about whom he or staffers expressed enthusiasm, often giving them equal footing with industry giants. Among the columns intended to champion artists outside of the mainstream that were created during Timothy's time at Billboard are Continental Drift, dedicated to unsigned artists, and Heatseekers, which highlights acts that have never appeared in the top half of The Billboard 200.He regularly wrote about un-sung artists in his column, Music to My Ears, and was a fearless advocate of artists' rights. He often served as the industry's moral compass by tackling controversial music-business issues."The first hire I made as publisher of Billboard in 1990 was Timothy," Billboard publisher Howard Lander says. "I needed a partner to help transform this venerable publication to better serve the music industry as it began a journey through a decade of enormous change. Besides possessing an inquisitive mind, a deep passion for music, and unmatched writing skills, Timothy led his life with the firm belief that a person had to be willing to stand up and be counted. I will forever be grateful for his companionship, courage, and friendship. We used to end most conversations with the simple phrase 'Words & Music.'"Screenwriter Mitch Glazer, Timothy's best friend since 1976 when they worked together at Crawdaddy, had lunch with Timothy minutes before his death. "He was in great spirits and was anticipating his 15th wedding anniversary, which was June 28," Glazer says. "He was the most present, alive person at the peak of his game. His last words were to my 16-year-old daughter, Shane, who was anxious about going away to Bennington College for a month. He said: 'You're going to be great,' and he started to leave. He came back, hugged her, and said, 'Rock on' and walked away. I think that's a perfect epitaph."Timothy came to Billboard with a distinguished journalistic legacy. He started his career as a copyboy, sports, and entertainment writer for the Associated Press in 1972, after graduating from Fordham University. He was managing editor and then senior editor of seminal music magazine Crawdaddy from 1976-1978. He served as associate editor and later senior editor at Rolling Stone from 1978-1982, where he interviewed such legends as Johnny Carson and Mike Wallace, as well as hundreds of musical artists.Timothy was also the author of several books, including "Catch a Fire" -- an award-winning biography of Bob Marley -- and acclaimed biographies on the Beach Boys ("The Nearest Faraway Place: Brian Wilson, the Beach Boys, and the Southern California Experience") and James Taylor ("Long Ago and Far Away: James Taylor, His Life and Music"), as well as a collection of his Billboard essays titled "Music to My Ears" (his final column, filed just an hour before his death, appears in the July 6 issue of Billboard. It will be posted later this afternoon on Billboard.com).He was awarded four prestigious ASCAP-Deems Taylor Awards for his book "Rock Lives: Profiles & Interviews," for his Music to My Ears columns, for his 1993 Century Award Portrait of the Artist profile of George Harrison, and in 2001 for his editing of Billboard's series on work for hire and musical copyrights written by Bill Holland.He was host/co-producer of "Timothy White's Rock Stars/The Timothy White Sessions," an award-winning nationally syndicated radio series.Like many journalists and frustrated musicians, White even drummed in a band, the Dry Heaves, for many years. The group included fellow writers Jann Wenner, Charles M. Young, Jon Pareles, and Kurt Loder.White's office walls at Billboard were decorated with plaques and notes from artists he had supported, thanking him for his commitment to them and their artistry. Perhaps the most fitting send-off for Timothy comes from Angelique Kidjo, who wrote, "May your soul keep on singing." THIS IS A NEW OFFERING TO YOU AND IS ONE OF THE OVERALL RAREST AND MOST SOUGHT AFTER SERIES EVER SYNDICATED TO RADIO. IF YOU ARE A FAN OF THE SHOW OR OF ITS FORMAT OR OF A PARTICULAR ARTIST THIS SHOW IS FOR YOU. THESE SHOWS CAME DIRECTLY FROM THE GENERAL MANAGER OF A MID POWER FM WHO HAS STORED THEM AFTER THEIR SINGLE BROADCAST HE AND I ARE FRIENDS SO WHEN HE WAS READY TO LET THEM GO, I WAS FIRST IN LINE TO GET THEM. HE IS USING THE MONEY FROM THE SELLING OF THESE SHOWS TO UPGRADE HIS STATION EQUIPMENT. IT IS THE FIND OF A LIFETIME. EACH SHOW HAS BEEN PLAYED ONLY ONCE AND THEN STORED. IT COMES WITH CUE SHEETS. I will be listing my special collection of these shows over the next few days so make sure to keep looking for them. These are my only remaining shows of the series and I don't think I will probably be able to get more. Quality radio shows are getting harder and harder to come across now that they are all transmitted to stations digitally and not on CD. What is out there now is all there is and most collectors are holding on to theirs as they grow in value and who would want to give up one of these shows anyway? If you like classic rock song after song, this is the show for you. The energy is over the top and the show goes by in an instant. The show airs on the WESTWOOD ONE RADIO NETWORKS and aired 90 MINUTES on TWO lp's for best fidelity. They were played only on the air date and then saved and stored by the station general manager who eventually sold them to me. This show is aired on APRIL 24, 1989 It contains TWO LP's with NINETY MINUTES of great music. ON THIS SHOW, TIMOTHY WHITE PAID TRIBUTE TO THE EDDIE MONEY NOBODY KNOWSTHE SONG LISTINGS CAN BE SEEN ON THE PICTURED CUE SHEET IN THE LISTING PICTURE This is the genuine original show that was sent to the radio station for airing. It is NOT an unauthorized copy but the Real McCoy!!! I personally guarantee that every radio show that I sell is the original show sent to stations. Stations could use the show anytime during that weekend and then it ended up available to us all to enjoy. This show and all the shows in the TIMOTHY WHITE ROCK STARS SERIES are ultra rare. In fact, when they are on eBay at all, they tend to get bought quickly. You are truly buying a show that will only increase in value and I am selling them at a price very close to what I paid for it. Remember that this and all the radio music shows that you see on ebay are not just about the music although these concert presentations are very rare and often cannot be found anywhere. It is the mixture of great music and great announcing that makes it so entertaining. As well, it is a piece of radio and music history. You just aren't going to find these shows around very much longer as everything is now digitized and downloaded for play and shows are no longer sent out on CD's Think of what they will be worth in a few years! (IF you wanted to sell.) I am selling to share with other music lovers what I was able to get at a reasonable price. MOST SELLERS PUT THESE SHOWS UP AS AN AUCTION AND WAIT FOR BIDDING WARS. MY SHOWS ARE ALWAYS A BUY IT NOW AT A REASONABLE PRICE SO YOU DON'T HAVE TO PAY MORE THAN YOU NEED TO TO GET THE SHOW THAT YOU WANT. SOME OF THESE SHOWS GO FOR UNBELIEVABLE PRICES. I WILL NEVER TAKE ADVANTAGE OF A FELLOW COLLECTOR. I COLLECT TOO AND LIKE TO GET A REASONABLE DEAL. THAT'S WHY I OFFER THE SAME TO YOU. It is a great show and would be a valuable addition to your collection. As always, for U.S. and international collectors, I charge only shipping on the first show you buy so the more you buy the more money you will save. (International buyers purchasing multi set shows pay only an additional $8 a show) Good Luck and God Bless You. Condition: Used, Condition: In mint, new condition played only on date of network broadcast. played once only and stored subsequently in air conditioned, non smoking environment., Artist: compilation, Country/Region of Manufacture: United States, Style: Rock 'n' Roll, Duration: LP, Record Grading: Near Mint (NM or M-), Speed: 33RPM, Record Size: 12", Record Label: WESTWOOD ONE RADIO NETWORK, Release Year: 1989, Genre: Rock, Sleeve Grading: In plastic sleeves, Special Attributes: 1st Edition

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