PRE-COLUMBIAN_Mesoamerican_Green Jade Oval Pendant Bead_4.9 x 21.9 x 14.3mm

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Seller: Top-Rated Plus Seller worldtraveler57 (3,406) 100%, Location: Miami, Florida, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 333336157675 I have a complete and utter fascination with old beads and have spent the better part of the last few weeks researching the Pre-Columbian culture as it pertains to beads and artifacts in the pursuit of writing descriptions for my eBay listings. * I have included some of those findings at the end of this description. For me the most precious part of old beads is the way they feel to hold. I love the characteristics of color, patterning, shape, patina and texture. This auction is for a Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican green jade oval shaped pendant bead. The bead has a light green color and is drilled at the top for suspension. There is a crack in the form of a fine surface fissure that wraps around the front to the back. I do not see any signs of glue, but do not know if it was ever repaired. Please see photos for details. The bead measures 4.9 x 21.9 x 14.3mm. The weight is 2.8 grams. PRE-COLUMBIANMesoamericanGreen Jade Oval Pendant Bead4.9 x 21.9 x 14.3mm Click images to enlarge Description I have a complete and utter fascination with old beads and have spent the better part of the last few weeks researching the Pre-Columbian culture as it pertains to beads and artifacts in the pursuit of writing descriptions for my eBay listings. * I have included some of those findings at the end of this description. For me the most precious part of old beads is the way they feel to hold. I love the characteristics of color, patterning, shape, patina and texture. This auction is for a Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican green jade oval shaped pendant bead. The bead has a light green color and is drilled at the top for suspension. There is a crack in the form of a fine surface fissure that wraps around the front to the back. I do not see any signs of glue, but do not know if it was ever repaired. Please see photos for details. The bead measures 4.9 x 21.9 x 14.3mm. The weight is 2.8 grams. Visit My eBay Store *"Jade was shaped into a variety of objects including, but not limited to, figurines, celts, ear spools (circular earrings with a large hole in the center), and teeth inlays (small decorative pieces inserted into the incisors). Mosaic pieces of various sizes were used to decorate belts and pectoral coverings. Jade sculpture often depicted deities, people, shamanic transformations, animals and plants, and various abstract forms. Sculptures varied in size from single beads, used for jewelry and other decorations, to large carvings." RELIGION "The value of jade went beyond its material worth. Perhaps because of its color, mirroring that of water and vegetation, it was symbolically associated with life and death and therefore possessed high religious and spiritual importance. The Maya placed jade beads in the mouth of the dead. Michael D. Coe has suggested that this practice relates to a sixteenth-century funerary ritual performed at the deaths of Pokom Maya lords: "When it appears then that some lord is dying, they had ready a precious stone which they placed at his mouth when he appeared to expire, in which they believe that they took the spirit, and on expiring, they very lightly rubbed his face with it. It takes the breath, soul or spirit. Bishop Landa has associated the placement of jade beads in the mouths of the dead with symbolic planting and rebirth of the maize god.[6] Precious offerings depicting maize have been found in the Sacred Cenote, paralleling the interment of the Maize God himself entering the underworld. Many objects found were considered uniquely beautiful, and had been exquisitely crafted before offered as sacrifice.[7] The Maya also associated jade with the sun[8] and the wind.[citation needed] Many Maya jade sculptures and figurines of the wind god have been discovered, as well as many others displaying breath and wind symbols. In addition, caches of four jade objects placed around a central element which have been found are believed to represent not only the cardinal directions, but the directional winds as well." WORKING JADE "Next to emery, jade was the hardest mineral known to ancient Mesoamerica.[10] In the absence of metal tools, ancient craftsmen used tools themselves made of jade, leather strops, string saws to cut and carve jade, and reeds or other hard materials to drill holes. (Mesoamerican artisans also used jade tools to work other stones.) Working the raw stone into a finished piece was a very labor-intensive process, often requiring repeated physical movement to shape the jade.[11] It would take many hours of work to create even a single jade bead.[12] Craftsmen employed lapidary techniques such as pecking, percussion, grinding, sawing, drilling, and incising to shape and decorate jade. Several of these techniques were thought to imbue pieces with religious or symbolic meaning. For instance, drilling holes into jade was thought to give a piece "life," or animate, a carving.[11] In addition to being an elite good of highly symbolic use in the performance of ideological ritual, the high pressure minerals that form these translucent rocks are much tougher and more damage resistant than slightly harder but far more brittle materials such as flint.” GREENSTONE ARCHEOLOGY “Greenstone is a common generic term for valuable, green-hued minerals and metamorphosed igneous rocks and stones which early cultures used in the fashioning of hardstone carvings such as jewelry, statuettes, ritual tools, and various other artifacts. Greenstone artefacts may be made of greenschist, chlorastrolite, serpentine, omphacite, chrysoprase, olivine, nephrite, chloromelanite among other green-hued minerals.[1] The term also includes jade and jadeite, although these are perhaps more frequently identified by these latter terms.[2] The greenish hue of these rocks generally derives from the presence of minerals such as chlorite, hornblende, or epidote.[3] Greenstone minerals were presumably selected for their color rather than their chemical composition. In archaeology therefore, having a loosely applied general term is at least partially influenced by the observation that ancient cultures often used and considered these various green-hued materials as interchangeable.” Payment Paid orders must be shipped within one business day. I combine shipping and will hold unpaid orders up to 14 days. Please contact me for a revised invoice for combined shipping before check out. Contact Us My goal is to provide you with the best possible customer service. Your satisfaction is very important to me and I do accept returns. If you would like to return your item, or have any questions or concerns please email me and I will help you directly. Images sell! Get Supersized Images & Free Image HostingCreate your brand with Auctiva's Customizable Templates. Attention Sellers - Get Templates Image Hosting, Scheduling at Auctiva.com. Track Page Views WithAuctiva's FREE Counter Condition: ?There is a crack in the form of a fine surface fissure that wraps around the front to the back. I do not see any signs of glue, but do not know if it was ever repaired. Please see photos for details., Featured Refinements: Pre-Columbian Antiquities, Type: Bead, Material: Stone

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