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LYMAN IDEAL 358 Cal LEAD BULLET MOULD MOLD 38 357 9mm

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Seller: el_rancho_costa_plenty (6,512) 100%, Location: THE Mountains OF New Mexico USA, Ships to: US, Item: 170590474898 LYMAN IDEAL 358 Cal LEAD BULLET MOULD MOLD 38 357 9mm Description : LYMAN Ideal, 38cal, 9mm, 1 Cavity BULLET MOULD, # 358-242 227 Round-Nose for LEAD CASTING BULLETS Used Ideal Mould , This Mould is throws a .358 diameter, 121 grain Linotype 1.450" OAL bullets, for 38 S&W SPL , and 121 Grain Linotype 1.585 OAL for 357 MAG Bullets It also throws bullets for 38 Super Auto, 121gr #2 alloy 1.160. And a 121gr #2ally .980 OAL for the 380 Auto. This #358242 Mold, is also listed for the 9mm Luger Parabellum, but only shows one grove, not the 3 lube grooves, shown in the other listings. This is a must for all you Cowboy Action Shooters, and Any other Handloader / ReLoaders that wants to save, on the High cost of Modern Ammunition. Cast your own, out of wheel weights lead and a little tin, These should pay for them self, in short order, just in Gas, saved, going to town, to buy ammo, to feed your S/W Black Powder, or Old Colt SAA Revolver. .38 Special From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia This article is about the cartridge. For the band, see 38 Special (band). .38 Special .38 Special rounds Type Revolver Place of origin United States Production history Designer Smith & Wesson Designed 1902 Specifications Parent case .38 Long Colt Case type Rimmed, straight Bullet diameter .357 in (9.1 mm) Neck diameter .379 in (9.6 mm) Base diameter .379 in (9.6 mm) Rim diameter .44 in (11 mm) Rim thickness .058 in (1.5 mm) Case length 1.155 in (29.3 mm) Overall length 1.55 in (39 mm) Primer type Small pistol Ballistic performance Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy 110 gr (7.1 g) JHP 980 ft/s (300 m/s) 235 ft·lbf (319 J) 130 gr (8.4 g) FMJ 810 ft/s (250 m/s) 189 ft·lbf (256 J) 148 gr (9.6 g) LWC 690 ft/s (210 m/s) 156 ft·lbf (212 J) 158 gr (10.2 g) LRN 770 ft/s (230 m/s) 208 ft·lbf (282 J) Test barrel length: 4 in (vented) Source: [1][2][3][4][5] The .38 Smith & Wesson Special (commonly .38 Special, .38 Spl, or .38 Spc, pronounced "thirty-eight special") is a rimmed, centerfire cartridge designed by Smith & Wesson. It is most commonly used in revolvers, although some semi-automatic pistols and carbines also use this round. The .38 Special was the standard service cartridge of most police departments in the United States from the 1920s to the early 1990s. In other parts of the world, particularly Europe, it is known by its metric designation 9×29mmR. Contents History First model M&P revolver designed in 1899 for the .38 Special cartridge. This particular revolver left the factory in 1900. Letter from Roy Jinks, Smith and Wesson Historian. Provenance of first model M&P revolver in .38 Special. The .38 Special was introduced in 1899 as an improvement over the .38 Long Colt which, as a military service cartridge, was found to have inadequate stopping power against the wooden shields of charging Moros during the Philippine-American War.[6] Most hand-loading manuals and other references date the cartridge to 1902 and the Smith & Wesson Military and Police revolver variation of that year. Although it was introduced thirteen years into the smokeless powder era, the .38 Special was originally loaded with black powder, but was offered with smokeless loads within a year of its introduction.[7] Despite its name, the .38 Special caliber is actually .357–.358 inches (9.0678 mm), with the ".38" referring to the approximate diameter of the loaded brass case. This came about because the original .38-caliber cartridge, the .38 Short Colt, was designed for use in converted .36-caliber cap-and-ball (muzzleloading) Navy revolvers, which had cylindrical firing chambers of approximately 0.374-inch (9.5 mm) diameter, requiring heeled bullets, the exposed portion of which was the same diameter as the cartridge case (see the section on the .38 Long Colt). Except for its length, the .38 Special case is identical to that of the .38 Long Colt, and to the .357 Magnum which was developed from the earlier cartridge in 1935. This allows the .38 Special round to be safely fired in revolvers chambered for the .357 Magnum. The reverse, however, is not true; the .357 Magnum case was specifically designed to be longer than that of the .38 Special so that .357-caliber ammunition would not chamber in .38-caliber weapons, which are not designed for the greatly increased pressure of the magnum rounds. The .38 Special is very accurate in a quality revolver, produces little recoil, and remains the most popular revolver cartridge in the world more than a century after its introduction.[8] It is used for target shooting, formal target competition, personal defense, and for hunting small game. In the 1930s, heavy framed revolvers oriented toward target shooting, such as the Smith & Wesson 38/44 Heavy Duty, allowed development of a higher pressure (and therefore higher power) version called the .38 Special Hi-Speed and eventually, the .357 Magnum. Today, versions of this cartridge loaded to slightly higher pressure are available, called .38 Special +P; these are usable in .38 revolvers rated +P and in .357 revolvers. There is also a rarely seen high-velocity load made by manufacturers such as Federal and Winchester, usually labeled "For Law Enforcement Only" and designated .38 Special +P+.[9] This ammunition is meant to be only used in revolvers specially proofed for this load and can cause significant damage to firearms rated for only .38 Special or .38 Special +P. Because the .38 Special also works in .357 revolvers, it is popular with users of the .357 for the reduced recoil, lower noise, and lower cost. A number of lever action rifles are also chambered in .357 Magnum and .38 Special. Performance Due to its black powder heritage, the .38 Special is a low pressure cartridge, one of the lowest in common use today at 17,000 PSI. By modern standards, the .38 Special fires a medium-sized bullet at rather low speeds. The closest comparisons are the .380 ACP, which fires much lighter bullets slightly faster than most .38 Special loads; the 9x19mm Parabellum, which fires a somewhat lighter bullet significantly faster; and the .38 Colt Super, which fires a comparable bullet significantly faster. All three of these are usually found in semi-automatic pistols. The higher-pressure .38 +P loads at 20,000 PSI offer about 20% more muzzle energy than standard-pressure loads and places between .380 ACP and 9 mm Parabellum, similar to that of 9x18mm Makarov. .38 Comparisons Cartridge Bullet weight Muzzle velocity Muzzle energy Max pressure .38 Short Colt 135 gr (8.7 g) 777 ft/s (237 m/s) 181 ft·lbf (245 J) 7,500 CUP .38 Long Colt 150 gr (9.7 g) 777 ft/s (237 m/s) 201 ft·lbf (273 J) 12,000 CUP .38 S&W 158 gr (10.2 g) 767 ft/s (234 m/s) 206 ft·lbf (279 J) 14,500 PSI .38 S&W Special 158 gr (10.2 g) 940 ft/s (290 m/s) 310 ft·lbf (420 J) 17,000 PSI .38 Special +P 158 gr (10.2 g) 1,000 ft/s (300 m/s) 351 ft·lbf (476 J) 20,000 PSI .38 Special +P+ 110 gr (7.1 g) 1,100 ft/s (340 m/s) 295 ft·lbf (400 J) >20,000 PSI .380 ACP 100 gr (6.5 g) 895 ft/s (273 m/s) 178 ft·lbf (241 J) 21,500 PSI 9x19mm Parabellum 115 gr (7.5 g) 1,300 ft/s (400 m/s) 420 ft·lbf (570 J) 39,200 PSI 9x19mm Parabellum 124 gr (8.0 g) 1,180 ft/s (360 m/s) 383 ft·lbf (520 J) 39,200 PSI 9x18mm Makarov 95 gr (6.2 g) 1,050 ft/s (320 m/s) 231 ft·lbf (313 J) 23,206 PSI .38 Super 130 grains (8.4 g) 1,275 ft/s (389 m/s) 468 ft·lbf (634 J) 36,500 PSI .357 Magnum 158 grains (10.2 g) 1,349 ft/s (411 m/s) 639 ft·lbf (866 J) 35,000 PSI .357 SIG 125 grains (8.1 g) 1,350 ft/s (410 m/s) 506 ft·lbf (686 J) 40,000 PSI All of the above .38 loadings, and the .357 Magnum, are when fired from a 6 inch barreled revolver - velocity is reduced when using the more standard 4 inch barreled guns[10]. Power (Muzzle energy) will, of course, decrease accordingly. Very few US police departments now issue or authorize use of the .38 Special revolver as a standard duty weapon, most having switched to the higher capacity and quicker to reload semi-automatic pistols in 9mm Parabellum, .357 SIG, .40 S&W, .45 ACP or .45 GAP. Handloading The .38 Special is particularly popular among handloaders. The cartridge's straight walls, headspacing on the rim, ready availability of previously-fired cases, and ability to be fired in .357 Magnum firearms, all contribute to this popularity. Additionally, the .38 Special's heritage as a black powder cartridge gives it a case size capable of accommodating many types of powders, from slower-burning (e. g. Hodgdon H-110 or Hercules 2400) to fast-burning (e. g. Alliant Bullseye, the traditional smokeless powder for this cartridge). This flexibility in powders translates directly to versatility in muzzle energy that a handloader can achieve. Thus, with proper care and adherence to safe handloading practices, the .38 Special can easily accommodate loads ranging from near-recoilless to that almost equaling the .357 Magnum.[11] .357 Magnum From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia Jump to: navigation, search .357 Magnum .357 Magnum ammunition Type Handgun/Carbine Place of origin United States Production history Designer Elmer Keith and Phillip B. Sharpe Designed 1934 Specifications Parent case .38 Special Case type Rimmed, straight Bullet diameter .357 in (9.1 mm) Neck diameter .379 in (9.6 mm) Base diameter .379 in (9.6 mm) Rim diameter .440 in (11.2 mm) Rim thickness .060 in (1.5 mm) Case length 1.29 in (33 mm) Overall length 1.59 in (40 mm) Primer type Small pistol, magnum Maximum pressure 44,000 psi (300 MPa) Ballistic performance Bullet weight/type Velocity Energy 125 gr (8.1 g) Bonded Defense JHP 1,600 ft/s (490 m/s) 710 ft·lbf (960 J) 130 gr (8.4 g) JHP 1,410 ft/s (430 m/s) 574 ft·lbf (778 J) 158 gr (10.2 g) Buffalo Bore Heavy 1,485 ft/s (453 m/s) 774 ft·lbf (1,049 J) 180 gr (12 g) WFNGC Hard Cast 1,300 ft/s (400 m/s) 676 ft·lbf (917 J) 200 gr (13 g) WFNGC Hard Cast 1,200 ft/s (370 m/s) 640 ft·lbf (870 J) Test barrel length: 4 in (102 mm) (vented) Source: Federal[1], DoubleTap Ammunition[2] MOdel 1894C—a carbine in .357 Magnum that is a companion to revolvers. Smith & Wesson Model 686-P and 8"-barrel 686 Silhouette .357 Magnum revolvers. The .357 S&W Magnum, or simply .357 Magnum, is a revolver cartridge created by Elmer Keith, Phillip B. Sharpe,[3] Colonel D. B. Wesson[3] of firearms manufacturer Smith & Wesson, and Winchester.[4][5] It is based upon Smith & Wesson's earlier .38 Special cartridge. The .357 Magnum cartridge was introduced in 1934, and its use has since become widespread. This cartridge started the "Magnum" era of handgun ammunition.[6] This cartridge has sufficient energy to produce hydrostatic shock (remote wounding effects) in living targets,[7] which probably contributes to its positive reputation for stopping power.[8] Design The .357 Magnum was collaboratively developed over a period in the early to mid-1930s by a group of individuals in a direct response to Colt's .38 Super Automatic. At the time, the .38 Super was the only American pistol cartridge capable of defeating automobile cover and the early ballistic vests that were just beginning to emerge in the post-World War I "Gangster Era."[4] Tests at the time revealed that those vests defeated any handgun cartridge traveling at less than about 1000 ft/s. Colt's .38 Super Automatic just edged over that velocity and was able to penetrate car doors and vests that bootleggers and gangsters were employing as cover. [9] Though .38 and .357 would seem to be different-diameter chamberings, they are in fact identical. 0.357 inch is the true bullet diameter of the .38 Special cartridge as well. The .38 Special nomenclature relates to the previous use of heeled bullets (such as the .38 Long Colt), which were the same diameter as the case. Thus, the only external difference in the two cartridges is a slight difference in length, solely for safety purposes as explained below. Much credit for the .357's early development is given to hunter and experimenter Elmer Keith. Keith's early work in loading the .38 Special to increasingly higher pressure levels was made possible by the availability of heavy, target shooting-oriented revolvers like the Smith & Wesson 38/44 "Heavy Duty" and "Outdoorsman", .38-caliber revolvers built on .44-caliber frames. The .38-44 HV load, used the .38 Special cartridge loaded to a much higher velocity than standard .38 Special ammunition. The .38-44 revolvers were made by using a .44 Special size gun with the barrel and cylinder bored to .357 caliber (the true bullet diameter of the .38 Special). Since the frame, cylinder, and barrel were much stronger than the standard .38 Special components, it was capable of withstanding much higher pressures. The .38-44 HV round, while no longer available, was in most cases the equal of the later .357 Magnum, which works at more than double the pressure of standard .38 Special. The .357 Magnum addresses the safety issues earlier cartridges had by stretching the case by approximately 1/8th of an inch, preventing the high pressure .357 cartridge from chambering in a firearm designed for the shorter, lower pressure .38.[10] Elmer Keith also contributed the Keith-style bullet, which increased the mass of bullet located outside of the cartridge, while leaving more room inside the cartridge for powder. The Keith bullet also employed a large, flat meplat, thus enabling rapid energy transfer for greater wounding properties. At the same time, this bullet design does not deform like a hollow point, and as a result achieves greater penetration. These characteristics of the Keith bullet make it very suitable for hunting applications as well as target shooting. In order to reassert itself as the leading law enforcement armament provider, Smith & Wesson developed the .357 Magnum, with Colonel D. B. Wesson leading the effort within Smith & Wesson, along with considerable technical assistance from Phillip B. Sharpe, a member of the Technical Division Staff of the National Rifle Association. The new round was developed from Smith & Wesson's existing .38 Special round. It used a different powder load, and ultimately the case was extended by 1/8th of an inch (0.125 in, 3.18 mm). The case extension was more a matter of safety than of necessity. Because the .38 Special and the early experimental .357 Magnum cartridges loaded by Keith were identical in physical attributes, it was possible to load an experimental .357 Magnum cartridge in a .38 Special revolver, with potentially disastrous results. Smith & Wesson's solution, of extending the case slightly, made it impossible to chamber the magnum-power round in a gun not designed for the additional pressure.[4] The choice of bullet for the .357 Magnum cartridge varied during its development. During the development at Smith & Wesson, the original Keith bullet was modified slightly, to the form of the Sharpe bullet, which itself was based upon the Keith bullet, but which had 5/6 of the bearing surface of the Keith bullet, Keith bullets typically being made oversized and sized down. Winchester, however, upon experimenting further during the cartridge development, modified the Sharpe bullet shape slightly, while keeping the Sharpe contour of the bullet. The final choice of bullet was hence based upon the earlier Keith and Sharpe bullets, while additionally having slight differences from both.[11] Performance This cartridge is regarded by many as an excellent self-defense round. It still enjoys a reputation of being the gold standard of stopping power among handgun cartridges and an "extremely reliable one shot stopper."[12] For big game, such as ungulates and bears, which have a substantially sturdier build than humans, it is inferior to the .500 Smith & Wesson, .50 Action Express, .44 Magnum, .454 Casull, .41 Magnum and other larger magnum rounds. Still, it is a fine small and medium game round and will kill deer very reliably at reasonable ranges if the right loads (140 grain and heavier hollow-point bullets, and solid semiwadcutter bullets) are carefully used by a competent marksman. For further comparison, the .357 Magnum has a higher velocity at 100yds, than its parent .38 special has at the muzzle. [13] Its stopping power on game is similar to the .45 Colt and has a flatter trajectory. It is a very versatile cartridge, and can be used with success for self-defense, plinking, hunting, or target shooting.[14] Revolvers in .357 Magnum caliber have the significant advantage of also being able to fire .38 Special ammunition, with its lower cost, recoil, noise, and muzzle flash. This trait makes .357 revolvers ideal for novice shooters who are not yet used to firing full-strength .357 loads but do not want the expense of buying a second lower-powered gun to train with. However, a .38 Special should not generally be used with any .357 automatic handgun or rifle, such as the Magnum Research Desert Eagle. It has also become popular as a "dual use" cartridge in short, light rifles like the American Old West lever-actions. In a rifle, the bullet will exit the barrel at about 1,800 feet per second (550 m/s)[15], making it far more versatile than the .30 Carbine or the .32-20 Winchester. In the 1930s, it was found to be very effective against steel ballistic vests, and metal-penetrating rounds were once popular in the United States among highway patrol and other police organizations. The .357 revolver has been largely replaced by modern, high-capacity semi-automatic pistols for police use, but is still very popular for backup gun use, and among outdoorsmen, security guards, and civilians for self-defense and hunting. Some common performance parameters are shown in the table below for several .357 Magnum loads. Bullet weights from 125 to 158 grains are common. 125 grain JHP loads are popular for self-defense; whereas, heavier loads are usually used for hunting. Loads are available with energies from just over 400 (ft•lbf) to over 700 (ft•lbf), and penetration depths from 9 inches to over 27 inches are available for various applications and risk assessments. The Marshall and Sanow "one-shot stop" rating varies from 68% for the non-expanding semiwadcutter which produces a ballistic pressure wave of 372 psi to nearly 96% for the well-known Federal 125 grain JHP which produces a ballistic pressure wave of 1487 psi. The average incapacitation times (for a 170 lb male shot in the center of the chest) vary from 5.7 to 11.4 seconds. Manufacturer Load Mass (grains) Velocity (ft/s) Energy (ft•lbf) Expansion (inches) Penetration (inches) BPW[16] (psi) PC[17] (in3) TSC[17] (in3) OSS[17] AIT[16] (sec) American Quik-Shok JHP 125 1409 551 fragment 9.0 1169 2.7 47.5 88.6%[18] 6.4 Double Tap Gold Dot JHP 125 1600 711 0.69 12.75 1064 4.8 69.3 (est) 91.3%[18] 6.7 Federal Classic JHP 125 1450 584 0.65 12.0 1487 4.0 79.8 95.8% 5.7 Remington Golden Saber JHP 125 1220 413 0.60 13.0 607 3.7 30.4 81.7%[18] 8.9 Remington Semiwadcutter 158 1235 535 0.36 27.5 372 2.8 12.9 67.6% 11.4 Winchester Silvertip JHP 145 1290 536 0.65 14.3 716 4.7 33.7 84.5% 8.2 Key: Expansion – expanded bullet diameter (ballistic gelatin). Penetration – penetration depth (ballistic gelatin). BPW – ballistic pressure wave associated with remote wounding effects known as hydrostatic shock. PC – permanent cavity volume (ballistic gelatin, FBI method). TSC – temporary stretch cavity volume (ballistic gelatin). OSS – Marshall and Sanow “one-shot stop” rating. AIT – Average incapacitation time, time from hit in the center of the chest until incapacitation for 170 lb male as determined from ballistic pressure wave model. Comparison 1956 made Colt "357" Magnum .357 Magnum Colt Python revolver The .357 Magnum was a direct competitor with the .38 Super, which was designed for semi-automatic pistols. Ballistic performance for the two rounds is very similar. However since the .357 is usually chambered in revolvers, it can be shot in barrels longer than one would normally find in automatics, giving it an increase in performance. In terms of accuracy, the .357 Magnum has at least the same potential for precision shooting as the benchmark .38 Special wadcutter round—indeed, a good .357 Magnum revolver will happily shoot .38 Special wadcutter ammunition with good results. It is this accuracy and power, and the versatility of also being capable of using less-expensive, milder .38 Special ammunition, that makes a .357 Magnum revolver an excellent gun for many different disciplines, from 20 yard (18.28 m) precision shooting to long range falling-plate events. It is an excellent round for those considering handloading ammunition, as it is economical and consistently performs well. As mentioned above, the .357 Magnum was developed from the earlier .38 Special. This was possible because the .38 Special was originally designed to use black powder, which requires two to five times as much powder by weight to produce the same velocity with the same bullet as does the much more efficient smokeless powder. Thus the .38 Special has a relatively large case. The 9 mm Para was introduced the same year (1902) but was originally designed for smokeless powder, and for higher pressures (~39,200 psi). It therefore produces considerably more energy than the .38, despite its case having less than 1/2 the powder capacity. Most 9 mm powder charges fill the case to the base of the bullet, and some are heavily compressed. Many .38 Special loads use the same powders, in similar charge weights, but because the case is so much larger, those charges only fill the case about half full. Light target loads with fast burning powders may only fill the case perhaps 1/8 full. Filling the case with slower-burning powders produces much more power, but also much more pressure; far too much pressure for older, smaller-frame revolvers chambered in .38 Special. It was to accommodate these high-pressure, high-power loads that the longer .357 Magnum, together with the stronger revolvers designed to handle it, were developed. Synonyms .357 Mag .357 S&W Magnum 9x33mmR (Europe) This is a list I compiled of identification numbers for Lyman handgun bullet moulds. The numbers come from both old and new sources. In some cases, those sources conflict. I went with the majority whenever possible and guessed when I did not have more than 2 sources. In 1982 the mould numbers were increased from 4 or 5 digits to 6 digits. (example: #311 8 became #311 008). I use 6 digits throughout even if the numbers were not originally 6 digits. Roundball moulds were no longer given separate numbers after Handbook #38 (1951). Their numbers were sometimes re-assigned. The first three numbers are nominally the diameter of the bullet. However, they were changed from time to time by Lyman. For example, I have seen the classic 44-40 bullet (#427 098) mould with the first three numbers shown as 424, 426, 427, and have heard of a 429. When you get to 45 calibers, they can range from 450 to 457, all with the same last three (cherry) numbers. The last three numbers are for identifying the cherry used to make the mould. There is some variation here, but less than with the first three numbers. I have read that Lyman has re-used some of these numbers, and that appears true (see #429 215). The weights are approximate. Evidently, Lyman used almost pure lead for figuring weights early on. The early books show heavier weights than the same mould shows now (which Lyman says is based on the Lyman #2 mix – 90%Pb, 5%Sb, 5%Sn). Depending on the mixture you use, it could easily vary +5% from what is shown. You could order a LOT of options in bullet moulds from Lyman in the past. Most moulds were also available as hollow points and a lot were available with hollow bases. In addition, some were made one or more lube grooves longer or shorter than the standard mould. This was done on longer rifle bullets most of the time, but I have seen a few handgun bullet moulds that way. Some non-standard ones I have seen had an "S" (for Special? or perhaps Short?) behind the mould number. "O" = Oversized. "U" = Undersized. "L" = Long. There are undoubtedly other letters on moulds out there. Lyman also stamped a number (usually two digits) on the moulds to keep the two halves of the mould together during manufacturing. This does not help identify the mould in any way other than being assured that they two halves were manufactured together. The bullet style shown in this list uses the following conventions: RN = Round Nose, SWC = Semi-Wadcutter (similar to Keith bullets), FP = Flat Point (usually used with RN to denote "Cowboy" type bullet shapes), HB = Hollow Base, HP = Hollow Point, Heel = Heel Base (for early Colt calibers), Spire = Pointed bullets, GC = Gas Check, TC = Truncated Cone, WC = Full Wadcutter. There are a lot of variation within some labels. For example RN-FP could identify the early bullets with a large round portion and a small flat. It could also be what is more popular now with less round and a larger flat. Also, the dividing line between what could be described as a SWC or as a RN-FP is vague. According to Lyman the moulds usually cast 0.003" to 0.005"OD more than the first three numbers in mould number. You could special order some that would be only 0.001" to 0.003" oversize. And you could order some that were undersized by about 0.003". I have not listed any of the 500 series cherries since they were proprietary. There were only a few of them anyway and most were to be used with a zinc washer for a gas check. Some 500’s look like heel-base bullets, but were actually to be used in swaging jacketed bullets. Lyman has at least three standard handle sizes. One for single cavity moulds, one for two cavity moulds, and one for larger moulds (4 to 6 cavities). The two cavity moulds will usually fit single cavity moulds without change. If they don’t, very little filing will get them to fit. Sometimes it is the thickness of the front of the handle (usually from burrs). More often, you need to take a little off the front of the handle between the hole and the nose. You can tell this when you close the handles and see that the rear of the mould halves do not close completely. You can still use the filed handles on two cavity moulds. Although some bullets can be used in both handguns or rifles, I decided to limit 32cal bullets to 120gr, 38cal to 195gr, 40/41cal to 240gr, 44cal to 265gr, and 45cal to 295gr. Others may use different cutoffs. An asterisk (*) after the ID number means the mould is available from the factory today. Nominal Mould Approx Top Bullet Caliber * Number * Weight * Punch Style * Notes 25 cal. 252 435 * 51gr 203 RN .25ACP 257 420 * 65gr 420 RN-FP-GC .256 Win. 32 Colt 299 152 80gr 465 RN-Heel 32 Short Colt Heel Base 299 153 90gr 465 RN-Heel 32 Long Colt Heel Base 299 154 105gr 465 RN-Heel 32 Long Colt Heel Base 299 155 80gr 465 RN-FP-HB 32 Long Colt Hollow Base 30/32 308 009 100gr 8 RN-FP-HB Hollow base 308 011 100gr 8 RN-FP 308 022 108gr 465 RN 308 024 109gr 8 RN-FP-HB 308 240 92gr 465 RN Also in 311 240. 308 244 89gr 465 RN .30 Luger 311 008 * 115gr 8 RN-FP Classic 32-20 bullet, also as 308 8. 311 010 100gr 465 RN Also seen as 308 10. 311 014 100gr 8 RN-FP 311 033 100gr 8 RN-FP-HP Same as 311 8 except Hollow Point. 311 227 90gr 465 RN .30 Luger 311 245 87gr 465 RN 311 252 * 77gr 465 RN .32ACP, also as 308 252 311 255 115gr 465 RN Also as 308 255. 311 257 110gr 465 RN Also as 308 257. 311 316 112gr 8 RN-FP-GC 32-20 Rifle 311 359 * 115gr 359 Spire-GC .30 Carbine 311 419 87gr 8 RN-FP-GC 311 441 115gr 8 TC-GC 311 465 122gr 465 RN-GC 311 576 120gr 465 RN-GC True 32 313 055 85gr 8 RN 313 057 100gr 8 RN-FP .32 Long, .32 Magnum , 32-20 313 226 95gr 226 RN Classic .32 S&W Long Round Nose. 313 249 * 85gr 226 RN 313 445 93gr 445 SWC Also in 311 445. 313 492 93gr 445 WC 313 493 104gr 8 RN-FP 313 631 100gr 445 SWC-GC 9mm 356 242 * 120gr 311 RN Also in 90gr & 107gr. Also 358 242. 356 402 * 120gr 402 TC 9mm Luger 356 404 95gr 495 TC Short TC, almost a wadcutter. 356 472 140gr 429 WC Small bump on nose. 356 632 100gr 395 RN-FP 356 634 130gr 395 RN-FP 356 637 * 125gr 637 RN-FP-HP Also in 147gr. 38/357 357 443 158gr 395 RN-FP Seats deep in case. 357 446 162gr 429 SWC Original .357 Magnum bullet. 357 453 150gr 429 SWC 358 063 148gr 344 WC 358 064 140gr 395 RN-FP Also in 155gr 358 070 150gr 311 RN-HB 38 Long Colt Hollow Base 358 071 146gr 311 RN Also as 360 71. 358 072 115gr 430 RN 358 073 105gr 430 RN-HB Same as 358 072 except Hollow Base. 358 075 160gr 429 RN-FP Also in 200gr. 358 087 125gr 311 WC Also in 140gr. 358 091 * 150gr 495 WC Bevel base, small bump on nose. 358 093 * 125gr 93 Spire-GC 358 101 75gr 495 WC Very short WC. 358 156 * 155gr 429 RN-GC Was SWC in the past. 358 159 125gr 311 RN-Heel 38 Short Colt Heel Base 358 160 150gr 311 RN-Heel 38 Long Colt Heel Base 358 161 145gr 311 RN 358 210 167gr 311 RN 358 212 146gr 311 RN 358 246 147gr 311 RN 358 250 156gr 311 RN 358 269 129gr 311 RN 358 302 112gr 302 WC Large bump on nose. Also 360 302. 358 311 * 160gr 311 RN Classic .38 Spl. round nose. 358 313 170gr 449 RN-FP 358 339 136gr 430 RN Blunt RN. 358 344 150gr 344 WC Also as 360 344. 358 345 115gr 429 TC Very short TC 358 356 108gr 430 WC Small bump on nose. 358 363 70gr 395 RN Very short. Also as 360 363. 358 385 150gr 311 RN 358 394 87gr 430 RN-HB 358 395 148gr 395 WC-HB Classic .38 Spl. target HBWC. 358 416 158gr 311 RN-FP 358 425 121gr 402 WC Also in 112gr. 358 429 * 170gr 429 SWC Keith 358 430 * 195gr 430 RN Also in 158gr 358 431 160gr 429 SWC-HB Keith, same as 358 429 except HB 358 432 148gr 429 WC Also in 160gr. 358 439 155gr 429 SWC-HP Keith, same as 358 429 except HP. 358 477 * 150gr 429 SWC 358 480 133gr 429 SWC 358 495 141gr 495 WC 358 665 * 158gr 495 RN-FP Cowboy .38 Spl., .357 Mag. 360 271 150gr 429 SWC 38 S&W, also in 358 271. 41 Colt 386 176 163gr 167 RN-Heel 41 Short Colt Heel Base 386 177 196gr 167 RN-Heel 41 Long Colt Heel Base 386 178 200gr 178 RN-HB 41 Long Colt Hollow Base, Blunt RN 38-40 400 090 168gr 43 RN-FP-HP 401 043 * 172gr 43 RN-FP Classic 38-40 bullet 401 088 170gr 43 SWC Designed by D. Sorensen 401 452 200gr 452 SWC Designed by G. Boser (Keith style) 401 633 200gr 43 RN-FP-BB 401 638 * 155gr 43 TC-HP 40 S&W, 10mm 401 654 * 150gr 43 TC-BB 403 095 195gr 95 RN Also in 145gr. 403 168 200gr 43 RN-FP Also in 225gr. 41 cal. 410 026 199gr 402 WC 41 Mag 410 027 217gr 402 WC-HB 410 028 212gr 43 RN-FP 410 032 200gr 429 SWC Available in several other weights. 410 214 181gr 43 RN Also in 101gr and 141gr 410 426 240gr 263 RN 410 459 220gr 43 SWC 410 610 * 215gr 43 SWC-GC 44-40 424 100 170gr 263 RN Also as 427 100 & 429 100. 424 102 155gr 263 RN-HB 427 098 * 205gr 43 RN-FP Classic 44-40 bullet, also was 424 98 427 099 200gr 43 RN-HP Same as 427 098 except HP 427 666 * 200gr 649 RN-FP Cowboy 44-40 bullet. 44 cal. 429 104 110gr 251 RN-HB 429 105 130gr 251 RN 429 106 175gr 251 RN 429 107 160gr 421 RN-FP-HB 429 184 235gr 251 RN -- 429 215 -- 205gr -- 251 -- RN -- T. Anderton target bullet. 429 215 * 210gr 421 SWC-GC Number reused. 429 220 175gr 220 WC Large bump on nose. 429 239 125gr 251 RN "Collar-Button" style, very short. 429 244 * 255gr 421 SWC-GC 429 251 255gr 251 RN .44 Russian 429 303 * 200gr 303 Spire-GC 429 336 250gr 421 SWC Designed by C.E. Heath. 429 348 175gr 348 WC 429 352 245gr 348 WC Designed by M. L. Holman. 429 360 232gr 360 SWC Designed by Gordon Boser. 429 383 * 245gr 251 RN Was SWC in the past. 429 384 241gr 251 RN 429 398 248gr 98 WC-HB Small bump on nose. 429 421 * 245gr 421 SWC Keith 429 422 235gr 421 SWC-HB Keith, same as 429 421 except HB. 429 434 221gr 98 RN-FP-GC 429 436 214gr 251 RN 429 478 210gr 251 RN 429 640 * 250gr 649 RN-HP-GC 429 667 * 240gr 649 RN-FP Cowboy .44 Spl., .44 Mag 430 185 210gr 303 RN-Heel 44 Colt Heel Base 45 cal. 450 225 170gr 374 RN Very short. 450 229 180gr 460 SWC Almost a TC. Also in 155gr HB. 452 066 215gr 460 SWC 452 374 * 230gr 374 RN Classic 45ACP bullet, also in 180gr. 452 389 185gr 374 RN Small round button on top. 452 400 240gr 374 RN 452 423 240gr 424 SWC Keith 452 424 * 255gr 424 SWC Keith, also in 454 424. 452 428 230gr 348 WC 452 460 * 200gr 460 SWC 452 484 225gr 374 RN-GC 452 486 193gr 460 SWC 452 488 195gr 374 SWC 452 490 * 255gr 424 SWC-GC Keith. Also in 230gr. 452 491 220gr 424 SWC-GC 452 630 * 200gr 460 TC 452 664 * 250gr 649 RN-FP Cowboy .45 Colt 454 067 200gr 374 RN 454 068 175gr 460 RN-FP-HB 45 Colt 454 190 * 255gr 190 RN-FP Classic .45 Colt bullet. 454 309 235gr 374 WC 45 Auto Rim, round bump on nose. 454 485 250gr 190 RN-FP-GC 457 122 290gr 191 RN-FP-HP Also seen in 322gr solid point. 457 127 210gr 374 RN 457 128 195gr 191 RN-FP-HB 457 130 145gr 130 RN "Collar-Button" style, very short. 457 131 285gr 190 RN-FP 457 191 * 293gr 191 RN-FP 457 195 225gr 191 RN-HB 450 Webley bullet. 457 196 290gr 191 RN-HB 455 Webley bullet. 457 401 193gr 401 WC Large bump on nose. Shipping : You pay only actual shipping with El Rancho Costa Plenty never a dime more. Handling charges are just a rip-off. Handling is just part of doing business online. I will be more than happy to combine all your wins from me and charge you only what the USPS or UPS charges me. Payment : PayPal is all eBay allows Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge Click to Enlarge inkfrog terapeak i000000 Brand: Lyman / IDEAL, Reloading Equipment Type: Bullet Mold, Gun Accessory Type: bullet casting, Accessory Type: Reloading Equipment, 38 SPL & 357 Mag: #358 242 #227

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