Five volumes: AMERICAN STATE PAPERS; Foreign Relations, Commerce, Naval Affairs

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Seller: 4097x (6,596) 100%, Location: San Antonio, Texas, Ships to: US, Item: 362674636199 View items for sale Five hardbound volumes of the AMERICAN STATE PAPERS, published by Gales & Seaton in Washington, D.C., 1832-1860: (1) Foreign Relations, Volume 1 (of 6) (2) Foreign Relations, Volume 5 (of 6) (3) Commerce and Navigation, Volume 1 (of 2) (4) Commerce and Navigation, Volume 2 (of 2) (5) Naval Affairs, Volume 3 (of 4) ================================================================== (1) Foreign Relations, Volume 1, from the AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. DOCUMENTS, LEGISLATIVE AND EXECUTIVE, OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE FIRST SESSION OF THE FIRST TO THE SECOND SESSION OF THE TWENTY-SECOND CONGRESS, INCLUSIVE: COMMENCING MARCH 3, 1789, AND ENDING MARCH 3, 1833, selected and edited, under the authority of Congress, by Walter Lowrie, Secretary of the Senate, and Matthew St. Clair Clarke, Clerk of the House of Representatives; CLASS I: FOREIGN RELATIONS, Volume One (Gales and Seaton, Washington, D.C., 1833; 766 pages, plus 43-page Index). The book is in "acceptable" condition and is being sold as a "reading" or "working" copy, perhaps to be rebound. Both boards are present, but the front board is detached and the rear board literally is attached by a string. The front end pages and all pages through Page viii of the "Introductory Notice" are bound to the front board, but together they are separated from the main part of the text block. Similarly, the last page of the Index at the end of the volume is bound with the blank end pages and the rear board, which, as stated above, is virtually detached from the text block. The rest of the text block, however, is strongly bound. The boards are well-worn and the leather on the spine has dried and is deteriorating, but the pages of the text block are complete and clean, except for the foxing that is consistently present, although no so much as to obscure the text. The book is ex-library, but the only indications of this appear to be the impressed seal marks of the "Cumberland County Historical Society" on the Title Page and Page 22. Also, on one of the blank end pages at the front of the book is the handwritten-in-ink name and date "Thomas Lee. July 1, 1834." Curiously one of the documents on Page 160 is a letter from Thomas S. Lee of Annapolis, Maryland, dated June 22, 1793. The volume contains Documents Numbers 1 through 120, dating from the first year of the constitutional republic (April, 1789) through early 1797; that is, through the eight years of George Washington's presidency. The first 88 pages present messages from Presidents Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson, and James Madison, who, of course, was President until March, 1817, but aside from these messages the volume focuses upon the 1790's and foreign affairs that mostly have to do with France, Great Britain, and Spain, although there are some hints of troubles brewing with some of the Mediterranean powers. A few months after Washington became President, the French Revolution took hold, traumatizing European and American affairs for the rest of Washington's presidency. A very large portion of this Volume One presents documents from American and French diplomats, especially Secretary of State Thomas Jefferson, Gouverneur Morris, and Citizen Genet. Anyone interested in the French Revolution might find these "as-it-happened" accounts to be bountifully intriguing. There are nearly as many documents relating to American relations with Great Britain and Spain, too, and there is a substantial quantity of documents from the negotiations leading to and immediately following the agreement that we've come to know as the "Jay Treaty," a treaty that would have enormous consequences for domestic American politics, essentially driving an irreparable wedge between the Federalists and the Democratic-Republicans, who saw the Treaty as a betrayal of a long-standing Revolutionary War alliance with our new sister republic, France. The Title Page for the volume being sold here (Foreign Relations, Volume One) indicates that this volume was published in 1833. However, elsewhere I am offering for sale a complete 38-volume set of the AMERICAN STATE PAPERS and the set's Title Page for Foreign Relations, Volume One, indicates that that volume was published in 1832, not 1833. Perhaps the Volume One being sold here has a title page with a printing error, which later was corrected, but the two Volumes One otherwise are identical, except for the publishing date. Foreign Relations Volumes Two and Three also were published in 1832. Volume Four was published in 1834; Volume Five, 1858; and Volume Six, 1859. Phillip W. McMullin, editor of GRASSROOTS OF AMERICA (1972, page iii), writes that: "The AMERICAN STATE PAPERS in 38 folio volumes which were the outcome of the above quoted act of March 2, 1831 (Stat. L, v. 4, p. 471), and of the subsequent joint resolution of March 2, 1833 (Stat. L, v. 4, p. 669), and act of June 12, 1858 (Stat. L, v. 11, p. 328) were printed by Gales and Seaton as stipulated. Twenty-one volumes were prepared under the provisions of the first named act and resolution, and seventeen volumes under those of the last act. They comprise the most important executive and legislative documents of the United States, selected by the secretary of the Senate and the clerk of the House of Representatives from the mass of manuscript and printed papers in the offices of the two Houses of Congress and in several Executive Departments. The series covers a period commencing with 1789 and ending with dates varying from 1823 to 1838. Each volume contains an index to the contents of that volume. Congress had acted none too soon, for the compilers say, 'The great mass of these documents were to be found only in the archives of the two Houses. No complete set of them existed in any other place. In addition to this, many exist only in the manuscript records of the two Houses,' and it may be added that the manuscript records of the two Houses were at that time already incomplete." A complete 38-volume set of the AMERICAN STATE PAPERS consists of the following ten different "classes" of volumes: Class I: Foreign Relations (six volumes) Class II: Indian Affairs (two volumes) Class III: Finance (five volumes) Class IV: Commerce and Navigation (two volumes) Class V: Military Affairs (seven volumes) Class VI: Naval Affairs (four volumes) Class VII: Post Office (one volume) Class VIII: Public Lands (eight volumes) Class IX: Claims (one volume) =================================================================== (2) Hardbound volume (Foreign Relations, Volume 5) from the AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. DOCUMENTS, LEGISLATIVE AND EXECUTIVE, OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE FIRST SESSION OF THE FIRST CONGRESS TO THE SECOND SESSION OF THE THIRTY-FIFTH CONGRESS, INCLUSIVE: COMMENCING MARCH 4, 1789, AND ENDING MARCH 3, 1859, selected and edited, under the authority of Congress, by Asbury Dickins, Secretary of the Senate, and James C. Allen, Clerk of the House of Representatives; CLASS I: FOREIGN RELATIONS, Volume Five (Gales and Seaton, Washington, D.C., 1858; 920 pages, plus 15-page Index). The book is in "acceptable" condition and is being sold as a "reading" or "work" copy, perhaps to be rebound. On the negative side both of the book's boards are missing and the leather on the spine for the most part has deteriorated. Although the book is ex-library (the Hill Reference Library of St. Paul), the text block is strongly bound and is complete and clean, except for the library markings on the Title Page and Page xv of the Index. I believe the binding of the text block is original, in which case Pages 401 through 408 originally were errantly bound between Pages 432 and 433. There is a quarter inch hole near the middle of Page 293/294. The book measures about 12.75 inches in height, 8.5 inches in width, and two inches in thickness. The volume contains Foreign Relations Documents Numbers 332 through 431 and the span the time period between February 9, 1819, and April 15, 1826. James Monroe is President and John Quincy Adams is his Secretary of State. Adams succeeds Monroe to the presidency in 1824 and Henry Clay is selected as Adams's Secretary of State. The nation's foreign policy initiatives focus upon Spain as a rival in the Floridas, the Caribbean, and Central and South America, where independence movements at last are springing up and which the United States finds affinity. The slave trade and its suppression increasingly is coming under scrutiny, as are the boundary lines between Maine and British Canada and along the western edge of the United States. The War of 1812, although concluded in 1815, lingers in terms of its costs and claims for slaves taken by the British following the Treaty of Ghent, particularly those slaves from Virginia and Maryland, as well as elsewhere. =================================================================== (3) and (4) Two hardbound volumes (Commerce and Navigation, Volumes One and Two) from the AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. DOCUMENTS, LEGISLATIVE AND EXECUTIVE, OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE FIRST SESSION OF THE FIRST TO THE THIRD SESSION OF THE THIRTEENTH CONGRESS, INCLUSIVE: COMMENCING MARCH 3, 1789, AND ENDING MARCH 3, 1815, selected and compiled under the authority of Congress, by Walter Lowrie, Secretary of the Senate, and Matthew St. Clair Clarke, Clerk of the House of Representatives; CLASS IV: COMMERCE AND NAVIGATION, Volume One (Gales and Seaton, Washington, D.C., 1832 and 1834; 1024 pages, plus 16-page Index, and 774 pages, plus 16-page Index). These volumes are being sold as "working" copies and the buyer might find it useful to have them rebound, particularly Volume One. The boards for each volume are detached and the leather on the spines has disappeared or is deteriorating. The books are ex-library. Although the text block for Volume One appears to be complete, the pages either are separated already or separating in sections. The pages themselves are clean and all pages appear to be present. Minor tears that do not affect the text are present. The text block for Volume Two is well-bound, clean, and complete. Again, the volumes are being sold as "working" copies. =================================================================== (5) Hardbound Volume Three of the four-volume NAVAL AFFAIRS class of books from the 38-volume series titled, AMERICAN STATE PAPERS. DOCUMENTS, LEGISLATIVE AND EXECUTIVE, OF THE CONGRESS OF THE UNITED STATES, FROM THE SECOND SESSION OF THE NINETEENTH TO THE SECOND SESSION OF THE TWENTY-FIRST CONGRESS, COMMENCING JANUARY 12, 1827, AND ENDING MARCH 1, 1831, selected and edited under the authority of Congress, by Asbury Dickens, Secretary of the Senate, and John W. Forney, Clerk of the House of Representatives; CLASS VI: NAVAL AFFAIRS, Volume Three (Gales and Seaton, Washington, D.C., 1860; 991 pages, including 31-page Index). The book is in fair to good condition. The boards are well-worn and the leather on the spine is scuffed and cracking. As you can see in the photograph, the leather in the bottom right corner of the spine has been chipped. The front board is slightly loose, but well-attached, and the rear board is strongly bound and not loose at all. The pages of the text block are complete, strongly bound, and not loose. The paper does not have the high rag content that is found in the AMERICAN STATE PAPERS volumes published in the 1830's and consequently the paper does not have the flexibility and durability common to the paper in those earlier volumes. This is not to say that the paper in this volume is falling to pieces. It is in good condition. Rather, one has to be more careful turning the pages in this volume, as one has to be careful turning the pages in any of the volumes published from 1858-1861. There are library stamp marks and other manifestations inside both boards, as well as on the two front end pages that otherwise would be blank. These two front end pages also have some fraying/tearing along the outer edges of the pages. Library markings also are present on the Title Pages and the first page of the Table of Contents. Pages 1 through 180 have a common tear located about three inches down the outside of the white margins. These start very tiny in size on Page 1, increasing to about a half inch, and then diminishing in size toward Page 180. None of this interferes with the text. Any other tears that are in the book are infrequent, small, and inconsequential. Pages 834-835, which are the first two pages of an eight-page exhibit titled, "Abstract of balance due more that three years from persons who have no credits," have tiny pencil check marks next to about three dozen of the 800 or so names alphabetically listed in the exhibit, but aside from the librarian-related markings mentioned above, these are the only extraneous markings I could find in the entire text block. The book measures about 13 inches in height, nine inches in width, and 2.5 inches in thickness. =================================================================== As an example of the extensive detail contained within these volumes, the following are the Tables of Contents for just the two Commerce and Navigation volumes: The Table of Contents for Volume One is by Document Number and is as follows: 60 Marine hospitals, February 24, 1802 149 Instructions to collectors, under the act to interdict commercial intercourse with Great Britain and France, February 22, 1810 151 Consuls and commercial agents, April 27, 1810 152 Relief of distressed seamen in the ports of Europe, December 12, 1810 157 Survey of the coasts of the United States, February 4, 1811 182 Prohibition of exports, July 20, 1813 185 Quantity and value of spirits, distilled from other materials than grain, imported from 1804 to 1812, January 10, 1814COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 5 Fisheries, February 2, 1791 9 Manufacturers' marks, December 9, 1791 41 Registered seamen, February 27, 1798 48 Same, December 9, 1799 52 Same, December 9, 1800 55 Same, December 14, 1801 57 Comparative duties paid in the ports of Great Britain on goods imported into Great Britain in American, foreign, and British vessels, January 5, 1802 64 Registered seamen, December 24, 1802 103 British restrictions on American commerce, January 28, 1806 127 Registered seamen, for the years 1806 and 1807, February 29, 1808 138 Naturalized seamen registered, February 4, 1809 150 Same, same, March 5, 1810 151 Consuls and commercial agents, April 26, 1810 152 Relief of distressed seamen in the ports of Europe, December 11, 1810 153 Same, same, same, December 19, 1810 159 British customs on American productions, January 10, 1811 162 Naturalized seamen registered, January 17, 1811 177 Same, same, January 11, 1813 181 Same, same, February 19, 1813COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY. 4 Duties arising on tonnage, year ending September 30, 1790 6 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1790 7 Imports for same date 8 Tonnage for same date 10 Dried and pickled fish exported, and entitled to drawback, January 5, 1792 11 Tonnage and imports for the year ending September 30, 179 12 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1791 13 Imports, tonnage duties, and exports, for the year ending September 30, 1791 14 Exports for same date 15 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1792, and the import and tonnage duties to December 31, 1791 16 Imports and tonnage for the year ending September 30, 1791, and exports for the year ending September 30, 1792 17 Comparative view of tonnage, domestic and foreign, for the years 1789, 1790, 1791, and 1792 19 Tonnage for the year ending September 30, 1792 20 Light-house on the coast of North Carolina, February 20, 1794 21 Same, same, March 17, 1794 22 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1793 24 Same, same 25 Same, September 30, 1794 29 Value of exports for five years ending September 30, 1795 30 Value and quantities of imports, and foreign and domestic tonnage, 1789 to 1794 31 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1795 32 Piers in the Delaware river, March 16, 1796 33 Extra tonnage duty on vessels entering Kennebunk river, March 24, 1796 35 Tonnage and imports for the year ending September 30, 1795 38 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1796 40 Imports for same date 42 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1797 43 Tonnage for the year 1796, and a comparative view from 1789 to 1796 44 Piers in the Delaware river, April 13, 1798 45 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1796 46 Tonnage for the year 1797 47 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1798 49 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1799 50 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1798 51 Tonnage for the year 1798 53 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1800 54 Tonnage for the year 1799 56 Imports for two years ending September 30, 1800 58 Exports to Italy, Gibraltar, and the Barbary Powers, for five years preceding September 30, 1801 59 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1801 60 Marine hospitals, February 16, 1802 61 Tonnage for the year 1800 62 Forfeiture of the privileges conferred on fishing vessels--petition of Isaac Sawyer, March 2, 1802 66 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1802 71 Fish exported, bounties and allowances paid; tonnage employed in the cod and whale fisheries, and the duties on tonnage from 1791 to 1800, January 29, 1803 72 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1801 75 Tonnage for the year 1801 77 Survey of the harbor of Nantucket, October 28, 1803 81 Amount and application of the marine hospital fund, January 13, 1804 82 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1803 84 Tonnage for the year 1802 86 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1802 93 Same, same, 1803 95 Tonnage of vessels paying foreign duties in the ports of the United States during the years, 1801, 1802, 1803; light-money collected from July 1 to September 30, 1804 96 Tonnage for the year 1803 97 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1804, and the value of exports for two years ending September 30, 1804 100 Imports from Great Britain and her dependencies, for the years 1802, 1803, 1804, which pay duties ad valorem, and the quantity of salt, rum, and nails imported during the same time 102 City of Charleston authorized to impose and collect an additional tonnage duty for the support of a marine hospital, January 24, 1806 105 Quarantine regulations, District of Columbia, February 17, 1806 107 Tonnage for the year 1804 108 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1804 110 Commerce with Great Britain and her dependencies, and all parts of the world, March 3, 1806 114 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1805 115 Imports for same date 116 Tonnage for the year 1805 117 Survey of the coast of North Carolina, January 27, 1807 119 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1806 120 Defects in the non-importation act, December 11, 1807 121 Tonnage for the year 1807 123 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1806 125 Extension of credit for duties on imports, and alterations in the embargo laws, February 11, 1808 126 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1807 128 Slave trade; petition of Elias De Butts, William Combs, et als., April 18, 1808 133 Tonnage for the year 1807 134 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1808 135 Sick and disabled seamen, December 29, 1808 136 Salt, January 7, 1809 137 Bonds required for enrolled or licensed vessels, January 25, 1809 140 Marine hospital fund, February 14, 1809 141 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1807 143 Embargo, May 25, 1809 144 Collectors credited for allowances to fishing vessels, May 31, 1809 145 Tonnage for the year 1808 146 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1808 147 Instructions to collectors relative to private armed vessels, January 20, 1810 148 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1809 149 Instructions to collectors, under the act to interdict commercial intercourse with Great Britain and France, February 22, 1810 155 Tonnage for the year 1809 156 Relief of destitute seamen in fore?gn ports, January 11, 1811 157 Survey of the coasts of the United States, February 1, 1811 158 Survey of the coast of Louisiana, February 2, 1811 160 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1809 161 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1810 164 Evasions of the non-importation act, November 26, 1811 166 Certain imported articles of copper not liable to duty, December 5, 1811 167 Tonnage for the year 1810 168 Improvement in lighting light-houses, December 4, 1811 169 Imports of spirits from other materials than grain, January 20, 1812 170 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1811 171 Tonnage from 1789 to 1810 172 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1810 173 Value of exports from October 1, 1790, to September 30, 1810 175 Non-importation act modified, June 10, 1812 176 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1811 178 Exports to Spain, for the year ending September 30, 1812 179 Tonnage for the year 1811 180 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1812 183 Tonnage for the year ending September 30, 1813 184 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1812 185 Quantity and value of spirits, distilled from other materials than grain, imported from 1804 to 1812, January 5, 1814 187 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1813 189 Tonnage for the year 1812 190 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1813 191 Tonnage for the year 1813 192 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1814REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 3 Discriminating duties on tonnage, August 5, 1789 23 Light-house on the coast of North Carolina, April 15, 1794 26 Survey of the sea coast; petition of Parker, Hopkins, and Meers, February 27, 1795 27 Same, December 29, 1795 28 Indemnity for losses arising from the negligence of light-house keepers, January 11, 1796 34 Survey of the sea coast; petition of Parker, Hopkins, and Meers, May 14, 1796 36 Defective registers, enrolments, and licenses, January 30, 1797 37 Temporary register, January 30, 1797 39 Return of registers, February 25, 1797 63 Piers in Delaware river, March 19, 1802 65 Discriminating and countervailing duties, January 10, 1803 73 Fisheries, February 13, 1803 74 Survey of the harbor of Nantucket, February 16, 1803 76 Quarantine regulations, District of Columbia, February 25, 1803 78 Survey of the harbor of Nantucket, November 7, 1803 79 Inequality of the allowances to fishing vessels, December 15, 1803 80 Fisheries, January 3, 1804 83 Collection districts of Petersburg and Richmond, February 6, 1804 85 Additional duty on tonnage for the support of light-houses, February 18, 1804 87 Pilots to pay hospital money for their apprentices, February 22, 1804 88 Piers in Delaware river, and obstructions to navigation in Christiana creek, February 23, 1804 89 Marine hospital fund, March 5, 1804 90 Pier in Barnstable bay, March 6, 1804 91 Fisheries, March 12, 1804 92 Imports into New Orleans entitled to debenture, November 27, 1804 99 Imported spirits admitted to entry in vessels under ninety gallons, December 16, 1805 101 Register restored; petition of Nicklin and Griffith, January 8, 1806 104 Port of entry at Newcastle, Delaware, February 10, 1806 109 Survey of the shoals of Cape Hatteras, Cape Lookout, and the Fryingpan, February 27, 1806 111 Further encouragement to fishing vessels at Nantucket, March 21, 1806 113 Marine hospital at Natchez, March 26, 1806 118 Liability of ship owners for the acts of their masters, February 18, 1807 122 Embargo; memorial of merchants and traders of the city of Philadelphia, January 11, 1808 124 Non-intercourse with St. Domingo, memorial of Joseph Chase and Jared Gardner, February 10, 1808 129 Embargo; memorial of inhabitants of Boston, April 21, 1808 132 Embargo laws, on President's message, December 8, 1808 163 Relanding of goods shipped for exportation, petition of William Patterson and Sons, February 19, 1811 165 Sea letters, petition of Thomas F. Wharton, December 10, 1811 174 Improvement of the navigation of the Potomac river, May 7, 1812 186 Marine hospital at New York, January 27, 1814 188 Sierra Leone, act in favor of Paul Cuffee, February 9, 1814MEMORIALS AND PETITIONS. 1 Shipbuilding--shipwrights of South Carolina, April 13, 1789 2 Same, ' same of Baltimore, May 4, 1789 67 Discriminating and countervailing duties--chamber of commerce, New York, January 24, 1803 68 Same, and shipbuilding--merchants and mechanics, New York, January 27, 1803 69 Same, same, Newburyport, January 28, 1803 70 Revision of act for registering and recording vessels, chamber of commerce, Philadelphia, Jan. 28, 1803 94 Arming of merchantmen, chamber of commerce, New York, December 28, 1804 98 Fur trade; manufacturers of hats, Philadelphia, December 10, 1805 112 Protection to the fisheries; Mulford, Howes, and others, March 26, 1806 139 Embargo: citizens of the third ward, New York, February 6, 1809 154 Non-intercourse; merchants of Philadelphia, December 24, 1810MISCELLANEOUS. 106 Norfolk and Portsmouth resolutions, February 20, 1806 130 Extension of credit on duty bonds; comptroller's letter, November 18, 1808 131 Instructions of Massachusetts to her delegation in Congress to procure a repeal of the embargo laws, November 25, 1808 142 Embargo laws; remonstrance of Massachusetts, February 27, 1809 =================================================================== The Table of Contents for Volume Two, also arranged by Document Number, is as follows: 198 Survey of the coast of the United States. April 4, 1816 199 Obstructions to American commerce in the provincial and colonial possessions of Great Britain. April 18, 1816 206 Discriminating duties. February 3, 1817 214 Survey of the coast. March 16, 1818 222 Commercial privileges enjoyed by the Netherlands to be extended to Prussia, Hamburgh, and Bremen. February 11, 1819 223 Commercial regulations of foreign countries. December 7, 1819 232 Survey of the coast of North Carolina. March 1, 182 239 Light-houses, &c. December 16, 1821 242 Survey of the coast of North Carolina. January 7, 1822 249 Relief to sick and disabled seamen in foreign ports. January 28, 1822 260 Survey of the Ohio and Mississippi rivers. January 22, 1823 261 Exports to and imports from France. January 22, 1823COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE SECRETARY OF STATE. 211 Arrest of seamen, deserters from foreign vessels, in the ports of the United States. January 3, 1818 229 Abstracts of American seamen for 1818 and 1819. January 10, 1820 249 Relief to sick and disabled seamen in foreign ports. January 28, 1822 253 Registered seamen for the year 1821. February 28, 1822 264 Registered seamen for the first three quarters of 1822. January 30, 1823COMMUNICATIONS FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY. 193 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1814 194 Tonnage for the year 1814 195 Bounty on pickled fish and salted provisions exported, allowances to fishing vessels, and the quantity of salt imported. January 31, 1816 196 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1815 200 Trade of the United States with the British colonies. December 10, 1816 201 Relief to sick and disabled seamen. January 9, 1817 202 Tonnage for the year 1815 203 Light-houses. January 21, 1817 204 Distressed seamen in foreign ports. January 25, 1817 205 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1816 208 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1816 209 Tonnage for the year 1816 210 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1817 212 Iron imported and exported. February 23, 1818 215 Tonnage entered in the years 1815 and 1816; American and British tonnage engaged in trade with the British possessions in Europe, and in the British West Indies and North American colonies, during the year 1816; and the quantity of foreign articles imported and exported for two years ending September 30, 1816 216 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1816 217 Receipts and expenditures on account of the marine hospitals. December 9, 1818 218 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1818 219 Tonnage for the year 1817 220 Coasting trade. December 24, 1818 221 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1817 224 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1819 227 Tonnage for the year 1818 233 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1818 234 Trade with the West Indies and British American colonies. February 19, 1820 235 Expenditures for surveying the seacoast, bays, &&c., and the light-house establishment. November 16, 1820 236 Tonnage for the year 1819 237 Exports for the year ending September 30, 1820 238 Imports for the year ending September 30, 1818 239 Light-houses. December 14, 1821 240 Application of the fund for the relief of sick and disabled seamen. January 2, 1822 241 Tonnage for the year 1820 246 Commerce and navigation for the year ending September 30, 1891 248 Imports and exports of wool. January 28, 1822 252 Tonnage money received under the act of March 17, 1800, and applied to the improvement of the harbor Baltimore and Savannah river. February 25, 1822 259 Commerce and navigation for the year ending September 30, 1822 261 Exports to, and imports from, France. December 18, 1822 262 Tonnage for the year 1821 263 Receipts and expenditures on account of sick and disabled seamen. February 1, 1823COMMUNICATION FROM THE SECRETARY OF THE NAVY. 231 Obstructions to navigation in the harbor of Presque Isle. January 18, 1820REPORTS OF COMMITTEES. 197 System of navigation for the United States. March 7, 1816 207 Port of entry at Cincinnati, Ohio. February 13, 1817 213 Ships owned by citizens of the United States from which registers are withheld. March 9, 1818 225 Statistical accounts of commerce and navigation. December 20, 1819 245 Ship Diana restored to the privileges of a sea-lettered vessel. January 15, 1822 251 Penalty for omitting to produce evidence of the desertion of two seamen in a foreign port. February 28, 1822 255 Trade with the British West Indies. March 15, 1822 256 Commercial intercourse with foreign nations. (navigation acts.) March 15, 1822 258 Tax on vessels and their crews arriving at Natchez, for the support of a hospital. April 25, 1822 266 Additional marine hospital in Virginia. February 25, 1823MEMORIALS AND PETITIONS. 226 Countervailing measures against the discriminating duties imposed on American products in France: Chamber of Commerce of New York. December 27, 1819 228 Same subject: captains of American vessels lying in the port of New Orleans. January 4, 1890 230 Sick and disabled seamen in the port of New York: governors of the New York hospital. January 13, 1820 243 Effects of the navigation acts of April 18, 1818, and May 15, 1820, on the commerce of Norfolk, Virginia: citizens of Norfolk. January 11, 1822 244 Further relief to sick and disabled seamen: Chamber of Commerce of New York. January 14, 1822 247 Same subject: seamen of the port of New York. January 28, 1825 250 Trade with the British West Indies: inhabitants of Boston. January 28, 1822 254 Same subject: inhabitants of Portsmouth, New Hampshire. March 15, 1822 255 Same subject: A. Appleby and others, of South Carolina, and Chamber of Commerce of the city of Baltimore. March 15, 1822 265 Natchez hospital: Legislature of the State of Mississippi. February 12, 1823MISCELLANEOUS. 243 Joint resolutions of the mayor, recorder, aldermen, and common council of the borough of Norfolk, passed the 17th day of December, 1821, on the effects of the navigation acts of April 18, 1818, and May 15, 1820, on the commerce of Norfolk, Virginia 250 Resolutions of inhabitants of Boston on same subject. January 28, 1822 257 Resolutions of the Assembly of the State of New York, on the improvement of the Hudson river. April 10, 1822 =================================================================== =================================================================== The purchase price includes the cost of insured USPS Media shipping to a destination within the United States. Condition: Acceptable, Condition: See item descriptions., Modified Item: No, Country/Region of Manufacture: United States, Topic: US History: 1789-1861, Format: Hardcover, Publication Year: 1832, Language: English, Subject: History, Special Attributes: 1st Edition

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