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RARE Ancient Chinese Clay Stoneware Tomb Model Cook Stove with Fish! Han Dyn.

$8,880.00 or Best Offer 4d, FREE Shipping, 14-Day Returns

Seller: houghton-usa (1,298) 100%, Location: Sequim, Washington, Ships to: US, Item: 252625924163 Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE This Han Dynasty Clay Ritual Pottery Stove is about 2,000 years old and is in “as found” condition, with no restoration. Excavation dirt, mineral deposits, detached tree roots that cling to the inside of the stove [see photo # 10], and slight deterioration on one clay corner of the stove [see photo # 9] all attest to the authentic nature of this wonderful ancient artifact. It measures approximately 10.75” long x 7.6” wide x 3.25” tall and weighs about 5 lbs. DETAILS: This ancient ceramic model of a Chinese cooking stove dates approximately to the Han Dynasty (206 BC-220 AD). This miniature cooking stove would have been made to accompany the soul of the departed to the afterlife in ancient China. Similar examples can be found in the world’s finest museums. This lovely example has a single removable chimney that would have carried the smoke away on a full-sized cook stove. The clay chimney fits flush into the 2.8” diameter hole in the top of the stove. {see photos # 11-12} Firewood would have been added under the stove through the small doorway cut into one end of the stove—just like the full-sized one. The top of the stove also has tiny molded examples of what cookware and tableware would have looked like on a real stove. This cooking stove was made by assembling flat, clay panels to build a miniature wood stove and then adding the cooking items to the top of the stove before firing. There are two, cooking caldrons molded into the top to represent the cooking areas of the model stove. But what I really like about this particular example is the 2.5” long fish that has been molded into the top of the stove as if it was frying on the stovetop! What a lovely addition! {Please see detailed photos # 1-4} Models of stoves, both in bronze and ceramic, were popular during the Han Dynasty, but became rare in later periods. In ancient China—like in ancient Egypt and Persia,—the afterlife was conceived as a continuation of life on earth. To provide for the needs of the afterlife, a variety of mortuary objects would be buried in the tomb so that the person’s soul could enjoy a safe journey and eternal happiness in the next world. There are several clay household item molded into the top of the stove as model representatives of actual household cooking items. You can see a fish in the corner, and upside down “ear cup” with two handles, and even a large table knife. The only thing missing is the handle of the knife on top of the stove, which separated from the top surface of the stove (see photo # 5). This ceramic stove would have been used by the model chef that would have also have been made of clay and would have come to life and prepare the delicacies most favored by our tomb occupant in the afterlife. This would show the gods that the deceased was a powerful and wealthy person on Earth. These tomb or mortuary objects, known as (ming-ch'i), could number into the thousands for wealthy and powerful emperors and members of their royal courts. {REF: The Mingqi Pottery Buildings of Han Dynasty China, 206 BC-AD 220} by Qinghua Guo. The most famous example is the massive full-sized, Terracotta Army or the "Terracotta Warriors and Horses" that are a huge collection of full-size, terracotta sculptures depicting the armies of Qin Shi Huang, the first Emperor of China. They were a form of funerary art buried with the emperor in 206 BC–220 AD and whose purpose was to protect the emperor in his afterlife. These Han Dynasty ceramic tomb models, figurines, architectural models, farmyard animals, and horses made specifically for the tomb (in Chinese “ming-ch'i”) are justifiably famous and can be found in most of the world’s major museums and in fine private collections. This is your opportunity to own an authentic, clay cooking stove from the Han Dynasty. It was imported from China prior to 1970, so it is legal to own and enjoy. China now strictly forbids the export of these historic national items. Han Dynasty Ceramics 206 B.C. - A.D. 220 The Han Dynasty is notable for its concentration on organized ceramic production. Mass-produced functional vessels, some stamped with place names and government offices, suggest that a true nationwide industry had come into existence and that some ceramic workshops were already state controlled. Molds aided tremendously in the manufacture of identical vessels, but the most important technical innovation was the development of lead glazing. These low-fired glazes were colored with copper to produce green, or iron to create yellow or brown. The toxicity of lead however meant that these new glazes were best suited to mortuary pottery rather than daily use. While soft-bodied lead-glazed wares were manufactured largely in central China, the coastal region of southern China continued the production of high-fired stoneware incorporating a wood or ash glaze with a yellow-green color range that can be considered an early form of celadon. The expanded Han repertoire also included painted grey ware, which often imitated lacquer ware, burnished black ware, and stamped and incised decoration both glazed and unglazed. Han ceramic tomb figurines, architectural models, farmyard animals, and horses made specifically for the tomb (ming-ch'i) are justifiably famous. REF: Minneapolis Institute of Arts CONDITION This Han Dynasty Clay Ritual Pottery Stove is about 2,000 years old and is in “as found” condition, with no restoration. It is in very well preserved, old burial condition overall with some amount of soil adhering on the piece due to the long burial time underground. Excavation dirt, mineral deposits, and slight deterioration of one clay corner of the stove all attest to the authentic nature of this wonderful ancient artifact. One can even see where tree roots remain wrapped around the inside of the stove while it was buried for about 2000 years. [see photo # 10] AUTHENTICITY Each object I sell is professionally researched, translated (if I can...(smile), and compared with similar objects in the collections of the finest museums in the world. I have been dealing in fine antiquities for over 45 years and although certainly not an expert in every field, I have been honored to appraise, buy, collect, and enjoy and recently sell some of the finest ancient art in the world. When in doubt, I have worked with dozens of subject matter experts to determine the condition and authenticity of numerous antiquities and antiques. This careful examination helps to insure you are buying quality items and helps to protect your investment. There are many modern reproductions or "fakes" on the market today, so be sure and buy only from experts in the field. Please examine the photos taken at 4x macro carefully as they are part of the description. The stand and AA battery are not part of the auction, just included to give you a better perspective. Note: Please ask any questions you may have before you bid! Thanks for Looking! Per e-Bay's rules, PayPal only please! THANKS! All Sales are Final--unless the item has been accidentally misrepresented. FREE SHIPPING cost includes Insurance and Signature Confirmation and is accurate for all 50 United States.Only Washington State residents are require to pay the state sales tax...sorry. Condition: This ancient Chinese earthenware cook stove dates to about the Han Dynasty 2,000 years ago and was once contained in a Han Dynasty tomb. Excavation dirt, mineral deposits, detached tree roots that cling to the inside of the stove, and slight deterioration on one clay corner of the stove all attest to the authentic nature of this wonderful ancient artifact. No repairs or restorations. The handle of the table knife molded on top of the stove has separated in antiquity from the stove and is missing. It measures approximately 10.75” long x 7.6” wide x 3.25” tall and weighs about 5 lbs.Please see photos as they are an important part of the description. Thank You!, Material: Pottery, Country: China, Dynasty: Han Dynasty, Provenance: Ownership History Available

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