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Persian Metal Sculpture Legend Myth Arash Kamangir Persia Hero Arash the Archer

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Seller: parspay (1,184) 100%, Location: Newport, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 272456625082 Persian Metal Sculpture Legend Myth Arash Kamangir Iranian Hero Arash the Archer. Approx Size Including Stand 12cm x 6.5cm x 6.5cm (Sculpture Only 10cm x 5cm x 2.5cm)Material appears to be some form of Zync (not sure!) According to wikipedia: Arash the Archer (Persian: Āraŝe Kamāngir ) is a heroic archer-figure of Iranian oral tradition and folklore.The basic story of the bowman runs as follows: In a war between the Iranians and the non-Iranians (in post-Sassanid tradition frequently identified with the Turanians) over the "royal glory" (khwarrah), the General Afrasiab has surrounded the forces of the righteous Manuchehr, and the two sides agree to make peace. Both reach an agreement that whatever land falls within the range of a bow-shot shall be returned to the Manuchehr and the Iranians, and the rest should then fall to Afraisab and the Aniranians. An angel (in al-Biruni it is 'Esfandaramad', i.e. the Amesha Spenta Spenta Armaiti, MP Spendarmad) instructs Manuchehr to construct a special bow and arrow, and Arash is asked to be the archer. Arash then fires the specially-prepared arrow at dawn, which then traveled a great distance (see below) before finally landing and so marking the future border between the Iranians and the Aniranians.In Talebi and Balami, Arash is destroyed by the shot and disappears. In al-Tabari, he is exalted by the people, is appointed commander of the archers and lives out his life in great honor. The distance the arrow travels varies: in one it is thousand leagues (farsakhs), in another forty days walk. In several, the arrow traveled from dawn to noon, in others from dawn until sunset. A few sources specify a particular date for the event. The Middle Persian Mah i Frawardin notes the 6th day of the 1st month (i.e. Khordad of Frawardin); later sources associate the event with the name-day festivities of Tiregan (13th of Tir) "presumably" provoked by the homonymity with the Yazata Tir or tir "arrow." (Tafażżolī 1987, p. 266)The location from which Arash fired his arrow varies as well. In the Avesta (which does not mention places in Western pars), it is 'Airyo.khshaotha', a not-further identified location in the Middle Clime. Islamic-era sources typically place the location of the shot somewhere just south of the Caspian Sea, variously in Tabaristan (Tabari, Talebi, Maqdesi, ibn al-Atir, Marashi); a mountain-top in Ruyan (al-Biruni, Gardizi), Amul fortress (Mojmal), Mount Damavand (Balami) or Sari (Gorgani). The place the arrow landed is variously identified as 'Mount Khvanvant' in the Avesta (likewise an unknown location); a river in Balkh (Tabari, al-Atir); east of Balkh (Talebi); Bactria/Tokharistan (Maqdesi, Gardizi); the banks of the Oxus River (Balami) or Merv (Mojmal). According to al-Biruni, it hit a nut tree between "Fargana" and Tabaristan "in the furthest reaches of [Greater] Khorasan."The name Arash remains one of the most popular names among Iranians. Origins of the name Although several sources (e.g. al-Biruni) appear to have considered 'Arash' to be the origin of the name 'Arshak' (i.e. Arsaces), the name of the Parthian dynasty derives from a Parthian- or Eastern Iranian equivalent of 'Ardashir', i.e. 'Artaxerxes', specifically Artaxerxes II, who the Arsacids claimed to descend from. (Within the scheme of the mythologically-conflated genealogies of Iranian dynasts, the Arsacids also claimed to descend—via the other Arash—from Kai Kobad).As is typical for names from oral tradition, there are numerous variations of 'Arash'. In the Avesta the name appears as 'Erekhsha' (Ǝrəxša) "of the swift arrow, having the swiftest arrow among the Iranians" (Yasht 8.6). This Avestan language form continues in Zoroastrian Middle Persian as 'Erash' (Bundahishn, Shahrastanha-i Eran, Zand-i Vahuman Yasht, Mah i Frawardin), from which the anglicized 'Eruch' derives. New Persian and Arabic forms include 'Erash' and 'Irash' in al-Tabari and ibn al-Atir; Aarashshebatir in al-Tabari; 'Arash' in al-Talebi; 'Aarash' in Maqdesi, Balami, Mojmal, Marasi, al-Biruni, and in the Vis o Ramin of Gorgani. Names with a stock epithet representing the Avestan "swift arrow" include al-Tabari's 'Aarashshebatir' and Mojmal's 'Arash-e Shewatir'. A surname form includes 'Arash/Aarash kaman-gir' "Arash, bow-expert." Modern legend Siavash Kasraie, contemporary Iranian poet, wrote the long poem of Arash the Archer in 1959 .This epic narrative, based on ancient Persian myth, depicts Arash's heroic sacrifice to liberate his country from foreign domination. - Please note that only one set will be supplied. - Most items are new (never used) and in good condition, however as the items are fully hand crafted and painted, some imperfections are expected. - All images are for illustration purposes and taken from a sample. - All items are shipped from United Kingdom. - Delivery to outside EU may subject to destination country custom regulations and fees. Buyer assumes all costs and responsibilities. - UK Delivery takes 3-7 working days. - While most international items are delivered within 1-2 weeks, however the official time line for International Airmail is up to 4 weeks and for Surface Mail it may take up to 12 weeks. - No tracking number will be provided unless expedited shipping is selected (Expedited shipping will be tracked by UK postal services and may take one week or more for delivery). - Please remember if there are any issues with your order, you need to contact us through ebay messaging and we would be happy to address them as soon as possible. My ProfileMy other Persian items (click on view more for full list):View More... Material: Metal, Made in: China

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