See Details on eBay Watch Contact

Ancient Egypt 70 Great Mysteries Akhenaten Rameses Senenmut Smendes Punt Yam Pix

$39.99 Buy It Now 18d, FREE Shipping, 30-Day Returns

Seller: ancientgifts (4,186) 99.3%, Location: Ferndale, Washington, Ships to: Worldwide, Item: 122204407371 Click here to see 1,000 archaeology/ancient history books and 2,000 ancient artifacts, antique gemstones, antique jewelry! The Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt by Bill Manley. NOTE: We have 75,000 books in our library, almost 10,000 different titles. Odds are we have other copies of this same title in varying conditions, some less expensive, some better condition. We might also have different editions as well (some paperback, some hardcover, oftentimes international editions). If you don’t see what you want, please contact us and ask. We’re happy to send you a summary of the differing conditions and prices we may have for the same title. DESCRIPTION: Hardcover with dustjacket. Publisher: Thames & Hudson (2003). Pages: 304. Size: 10¾ x 8¼ x 1¼ inches, 3½ pounds. Summary: Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt” celebrates the enigmatic face of the best-known ancient civilization. In this intriguing book seventeen Egyptologists and archaeologists probe the most compelling mysteries in the light of recent research and discoveries. In some cases the answers seem straightforward. On others, the shroud of mystery still hangs heavy. There are the puzzles that set the ancient Egyptians apart from other cultures. Where did these people come from originally, and why did they believe their king was a god? Why did they mummify their loved ones, and then write letters to them in death? Some mysteries revolve around Egypt's relations with other peoples and nations abroad such as the lost African kingdoms of Yam and Punt, the Israelites and their exodus to the Promised Land, or the Sea People warriors of the ancient Mediterranean. For instance, were the Sea Peoples fearsome raiders or fear-stricken refugees? And why did Egypt’s own empire of gold finally crumble? Even today, Egyptologists continue to unearth tantalizing new mysteries: evidence that Tutankhamun was murdered, intact boats buried deep in the desert beside the tombs of the earliest kings, unexplained shafts inside the Great Pyramid that seem to align with the stars, and a massive mausoleum built for the sons of Rameses II. All the famous people and places of ancient Egypt are discussed; Rameses the Great, Cleopatra, Akhenaten, the Great Pyramid, the Valley of the Kings; as well as fascinating but shadowy figures such as Senenmut, Smendes, and Khababash. Packed with hundreds of evocative photographs and specially commissioned and illuminating new diagrams, maps, plans, and reconstructions, “The Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt” is a unique exploration of this most romantic and inspiring of all ancient civilizations. Complementing the intriguing texts are 424 illustrations, 354 in color. CONDITION: NEW. New oversized hardcover w/dustjacket. Thames & Hudson (2003) 304 pages. Still in manufacturer's wraps. Unblemished and pristine in every respect. Pages are clean, crisp, unmarked, unmutilated, tightly bound, unambiguously unread. Satisfaction unconditionally guaranteed. In stock, ready to ship. No disappointments, no excuses. PROMPT SHIPPING! HEAVILY PADDED, DAMAGE-FREE PACKAGING! Meticulous and accurate descriptions! Selling rare and out-of-print ancient history books on-line since 1997. We accept returns for any reason within 14 days! PLEASE SEE DESCRIPTIONS AND IMAGES BELOW FOR DETAILED REVIEWS AND FOR PAGES OF PICTURES FROM INSIDE OF BOOK. PLEASE SEE PUBLISHER, PROFESSIONAL, AND READER REVIEWS BELOW. PUBLISHER REVIEWS: REVIEW: Ancient Egypt: so familiar and yet so distant. In this new compendium an international team of seventeen Egyptologists and archaeologists probe the most compelling mysteries in the light of recent research and discoveries so as to unlock the secrets of the Pharaohs. The Earliest Egyptians: From their origins to the first kings, from human sacrifice in the royal tombs to the boat burials at Abydos. Pyramids and Tombs: Origins of the pyramids. The Great Pyramid. Riddles of the Great Sphinx. Where is the body of Akhenaten? Who robbed the Valley of the Kings? The missing tomb of Tannis. Pharaohs and Queens: The assassination of kings. The first woman to rule Egypt. The disappearance of Nefertiti. Khababash, the guerilla king. The fatal attraction of Cleopatra. REVIEW: Ancient Egypt--so familiar and yet so distant. In this new compendium in the popular Seventy series, an international team of Egyptologists and archaeologists probes the most compelling mysteries in the light of recent research and discoveries. First, there are the puzzles that set the ancient Egyptians apart from other cultures. Where did these people come from originally, and why did they believe their king was a god? Why did they mummify their loved ones in death--and then write letters to them? Some mysteries revolve around Egypt's relations with other peoples such as the lost African kingdoms of Yam and Punt, the Israelites and their exodus to the Promised Land, or the Sea People warriors of the ancient Mediterranean. Even today, Egyptologists continue to unearth new mysteries: evidence that Tutankhamun was murdered, unexplained shafts inside the Great Pyramid that seem to align with the stars, and a massive mausoleum built for the sons of Rameses II. All the famous people and places of ancient Egypt are discussed--Rameses the Great, Cleopatra, Akhenaten, the Great Pyramid, the Valley of the Kings--as well as fascinating but shadowy figures such as Senenmut, Smendes, and Khababash. Hundreds of evocative photographs and specially commissioned diagrams, maps, plans, and reconstructions complement the intriguing texts. REVIEW: Ancient Egypt - so familiar and yet so distant. We know so much about it, but there are still many unresolved questions. What were the pyramids actually for? How old is the Great Sphinx? Did Moses learn his beliefs at the court of Akhenaten? Why did the beautiful queen Nefertiti suddenly disappear? This volume explores and explains 70 of the most intriguing mysteries of this ancient civilization. REVIEW: Dr Bill Manley is a British Egyptologist, university lecturer and museum curator, known for devising popular forms of access to the study of Ancient Egypt. These days he teaches Egyptology and Coptic at the University of Glasgow and Complutense University in Madrid, as well as being an Honorary Research Fellow of the University of Liverpool and Honorary President of Egyptology Scotland. In the past he has worked with archaeological surveys in Egypt and Palestine, while his output includes textbooks, specialist articles, translations of ancient texts, entries to anthologies and encyclopaedias, museum exhibitions, and collaborations with musicians. REVIEW: Bill Manley has been a lecturer in Egyptology at the universities of London and of Liverpool. His publications include two best-selling books, “The Penguin Historical Atlas of Ancient Egypt” and, with Mark Collier, “How to Read Egyptian Hieroglyphs. REVIEW: TABLE OF CONTENTS: The Earliest Egyptians. 1. Where did the Egyptians come from? 2. Did the Egyptians invent writing? 3. Who were the first kings of Egypt? 4. King Menes: myth or reality? 5. Human sacrifice in the royal tombs. 6. The royal boat burials at Abydos. Pyramids & Tombs. 7. Origins of the pyramids 8. What is a pyramid for? 9. Were the pyramids built by slaves? 10. The multiple pyramids of Snofru. 11. The Great Pyramid. 12. Riddles of the Great Sphinx. 13. Are the pyramids aligned with the stars? 14. The anonymous Qurneh burial. 15. Abydos: the last royal pyramid? 16. The lost tomb of Amenhotep I. 17. Where is the body of Akhenaten? 18. The mausoleum of the sons of Ramesses II. 19. Who robbed the Valley of the Kings? 20. The missing tombs of Tanis. 21. Are there more royal tombs in Egypt? Pharaohs & Queens. 22. Did the pharaohs marry their sisters? 23. The assassination of kings. 24. The first woman to rule Egypt. 25. Senenmut: a partner for Hatshepsut? 26. What became of Hatshepsut? 27. The enigma of Akhenaten. 28. Why did Nefertiti disappear? 29. The Tutankhamun conspiracy. 30. The 'Elder Lady'. 31. Smendes: the alternative king? 32. The Nubian 'Dark Age'. 33. Khababash, the guerrilla king. 34. The fatal attraction of Cleopatra. People & Places. 35. Where was the kingdom of Yam? 36. Sinuhe: literary hero or real-life deserter? 37. Who were the Hyksos? 38. The Minoan paintings of Avaris. 39. Was Alashiya Cyprus? 40. Punt and God's Land. 41. The 'Sea Peoples': raiders or refugees? 42. The Report of Wenamun: fact or fable? Ancient Wisdom & Belief. 43. The mysterious gods of Egypt. 44. Was the king really a god? 45. Mummification and the passion of Osiris. 46. Why write letters to the dead? 47. The power of magic. 48. Why use hieroglyphic writing? 49. The origins of Egyptian literature. 50. Hidden symbols of sex in Egyptian art. Historical Mysteries. 51. What did the Egyptians know of their history? 52. The end of the great pyramid age. 53. The First Intermediate Period - a dark age? 54. The end of the second pyramid age. 55. Did the Egyptians go to sea? 56. Did Egypt rule Palestine? 57. Who won the Battle of Qadesh? 58. What became of Egypt's Golden Empire? 59. The missing Apis bull burials. 60. Did Necho send a fleet around Africa? 61. How did the Egyptians work granite? 62. Did the Egyptians invent glass? 63. Why was there no Egyptian Iron Age? 64. What did Herodotus see in Egypt? Egypt & the Bible. 65. Joseph: an Egyptian vizier? 66. Was Moses at the court of Akhenaten? 67. The Israelite Exodus: myth or reality? 68. Was Labayu King Saul? 69. Who was Solomon's father-in-law? 70. Who was 'King Shishak of Egypt'? PROFESSIONAL REVIEWS: REVIEW: Were the pyramids built by slaves? Did the pharaohs marry their sisters? Are there more royal tombs yet to be discovered in Egypt? These are just three of the 70 mysteries broached by 17 eminent Egyptologists and archaeologists in this all-colour sprint through ancient Egyptian history. Edited by the distinguished Egyptologist, Bill Manley, The Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt uses recent research and discoveries to provide a comprehensive, up-to-date, and entertaining introduction to one of the world’s most compelling ancient peoples. But although the book provides solutions to some of Egyptology’s greatest riddles, some remain shrouded in mystery. Take, for example, the conundrum of Punt, a magical place, source of aromatics and exotic products, and evocatively known to the ancient Egyptians as ‘God’s Land’. Today, no-one knows exactly where Punt really was: Yemen, Eritrea, Somalia, or somewhere else? There survive only a dozen or so Egyptian texts that mention this elusive land, and all fail to give any clue of the distances or journey times involved. In fact, the best information about Punt comes not in the texts, but from the fabulous reliefs that adorn Queen Hatshepsut’s temple at Deir el-Bahri. Hatshepsut’s finely-executed sculptures show the people of Punt, including the Puntite chief’s obese wife, their houses shaped like beehives and mounted on stilts, their produce, and their animals. Such is the detail of the depictions, that archaeologists have even been able to identify the varieties of fish shown swimming in an unknown sea. If only the land of Punt could be identified, archaeologists would have so much more information, not only about ancient Egyptian connections with other lands (Punt was known to the Egyptians for over 2000 years), but also about the very land of Punt to which the Egyptians travelled. Since arguments still rage over Punt’s whereabouts, the reader is offered all the possible locations – including the latest view that ‘God’s Land’ was probably somewhere in the region of Ethiopia and eastern Sudan. From God’s Land to the gods themselves, this book has it all. The book is organised into seven topics, and within the subject ‘Ancient Wisdom and Belief’, we get a round-up of the gods of Egypt, find out whether the king was really a god, and learn about the ancient Egyptian power of magic. Plus, intriguingly, we get the answer to the question: ‘why write letters to the dead?’. Although writing to the dead may seem bizarre, it is the content of these letters that is even stranger. Letters to the dead were not resumés of family events, nor did they ask how the deceased were getting on in the afterlife. Instead, they dealt with the problems of the living: debt, illness, bad-luck, and all manner of worries. The living wrote with the expectation that the dead would help them out, and sometimes even chastised their dead relatives for not having done more already to help them. To the ancient Egyptians, many things, such as disease, were thought to lie outside the direct control of humans, but within the control of the gods and spirits. Hence the letters: if a problem was the result of a malevolent spirit, then who better to help you than a beneficial spirit of your own? As the book highlights, the Egyptians believed in an inexorable link between the spirit world and people. However, this link is most powerfully embodied in Egypt’s ancient rulers, whose godly status they unquestioningly accepted. Although these erstwhile leaders are probably not gods in our eyes, a number have certainly gained the immortality they coveted so greatly: their names remain known to us today – even if most of us do not know much about their lives. Again, this book comes up trumps, delving into the mysteries that surround the best-known ancient leaders, thereby providing an invaluable introduction to each. Hot on the heals of the conspiracy of the boy-king, Tutankhamen, comes a look at the fatal-attraction of Cleopatra, the disappearance of Nefertiti, the fate of Hatshepsut, and the enigma of Akhenaten. Each brief (running at most to four pages), yet revelationary, account not only lays bare the mysteries, but is chock-full of fascinating snippets; such as the fact that Cleopatra was probably nothing special to look at, but was a sparkling wit; or the likelihood that the great Sphinx at Giza was once painted in bright colours – the face and body were probably red, while the stripes of the headdress were of alternating blue and yellow. Incidentally, the answers to the questions posed at the start of this review are: probably not, yes, and must be. Intrigued to know the reasons why? Then this comprehensive, accessible, and entertaining book is one for you. REVIEW: Organized as 70 short, easily digestible essays by noted scholars, this engaging and lavishly illustrated survey covers all of ancient Egypt's greatest hits, including the pyramids, hieroglyphics and mummies, along with intriguing biographical material on such pharaonic celebrities as the courageous Ramesses (whose battle of Qadesh in 1275 B.C. is the first for which we have a detailed historical record), religious reformer Akhenaten and his queen Nefertiti, lady pharaoh Hatshepsut and, of course, Cleopatra. Alongside sensational subjects like assassinations and pharaonic incest are equally interesting background articles on Egyptian prehistory, technology, religion and literature. The authors discourage the "fantasy archaeology" behind suggestions about the extra-terrestrial or Atlantean provenance of Egyptian culture, but they include a generally indulgent, if non-committal, section on the possible concordance between Biblical stories about Egypt and the historical reality. Although written for laypeople in an accessible style, there is a fair amount of depth to the articles, which bring a wealth of archaeological, linguistic and textual evidence to bear on the controversies they explore. A few subjects, like the fecund Nile agricultural system that underlay Egypt's ascendance, receive skimpy coverage, while some of the denser pieces about the whereabouts of various pharaohs' tombs and corpses address mysteries that only an Egyptologist could relish. But the wide-ranging, skillfully written and conveniently browse-friendly articles and the hundreds of ravishing color photos of art and architecture demonstrate anew why Egypt is holds a continuing fascination. 434 illustrations with 344 in color. REVIEW: Mostly British scholars, but some also from the US and the continent, explore the earliest Egyptians, pyramids and tombs, pharaohs and queens, people and places, ancient wisdom and belief, historical mysteries, the mummification process, and the murder (or not) of Tutanhkamun, and Egypt and the Bible. The text is copiously accompanied by magnificent large color photographs. A selection of Discovery Channel, History, and Book-of-the-Month clubs. REVIEW: In this new compendium in the popular Seventies series, Egyptologists and archaeologists probe mysteries and puzzles such as origins of the ancient Egyptians, the mummification process, and the murder (or not) of Tut. A selection of Discovery Channel, History, and Book-of-the-Month clubs. READER REVIEWS: REVIEW: "Seventy Great Mysteries of Ancient Egypt" is an unusual book, a collection of seventy very condensed essays (4-5 pages each) about pre-dynastic Egypt, Egyptian burial practices, kingship, history and religion, and the Bible. The book is quite well produced, with numerous color photographs. The organization of this book is highly innovative. Most books on ancient civilizations can be classified either as histories (example: Peter Clayton's "Chronicles of the Pharaohs") or as topical studies (example: Barbara Watterson's "Gods of Ancient Egypt.") This book is radically different. It begins, like all true learning, with questions: Who was Nefertiti? Was the Exodus myth or reality? Who robbed the Valley of the Kings? The FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) has long been a staple of computer science, but I have seldom seen it applied so thoughtfully and so well to the study of an ancient civilization. You'd think that a book like this might be both narrow (only 70 questions? Come on!) and shallow (only 4-5 pages per question!) But actually neither is the case. In terms of coverage, Egyptian art and sociology (especially non-royal women and the working class) are slighted, but other than that, the book's essays sample a remarkable variety of Egyptian life and culture. The covered topics include basic information about ancient Egypt ("Were the pyramids built by slaves?"), ongoing investigations ("The Sea Peoples: raiders of refugees?"), popular/fringe topics ("Are the pyramids aligned with the stars?"), and a few obscure but interesting things that I, at least, had never heard of before ("Khababash, the guerrilla king.") As for depth of coverage, in a few short pages per topic the authors are not able to get into much detail (thousands of book-length studies have been written just about Nefertiti, for example), but on the other hand, the authors have read those thousands of books so that we don't have to; their essays are accurate, reliable, absolutely up to date (as of 2003), and because they are written by experts in each topic, will contain some information that even other Egyptologists may not be aware of. Whether you are a beginner or expert on Egypt, there is sure to be something in this very innovative book to please and delight you. Highly recommended! REVIEW: Wonderful read. I might not recommend it as a first book about Ancient Egypt, but something to enjoy after you've read Gardiner, or “The Complete Pharoahs”, or whatever introductory book you like. It's not that the book requires background knowledge - they have an introductory few paragraphs that concisely summarize the background to the question, but putting the questions into a larger context is important with 3,000 years of history. The scholarship is very sound, with academic papers and general reading works listed among the bibliography (each question gets its on bibliography), yet each section is quite readable. It explores the usual questions - the pyramids, the Palette of Narmer, the dating and attribution problems, etc. I sure would be excited to see an updated "Another 70 Mysteries" for skipped questions (notably in the areas of technology, everyday life, art historical and philological issues) and discoveries since 2003, the copyright date. REVIEW: The seventy great mysteries of Ancient Egypt is a most fascinating book to read. If you are interested in learning about Ancient Egypt and there are some things you are not sure about, you'd most likely find answers in this book. Some of the topics covered are why did they mummify the bodies of their loved ones, and why did they write letters to the dead, and how were the pyramids built. Answers to these questions are found in this book. It is a most intriguing book. There are seventeen Egyptologists and archaeologists who probe the most compelling mysteries in the research and discoveries. In some cases the answers are straight forward. Others the shroud of the mystery still hangs heavy. There are also stories on Nefertiti pertaining to the mystery of her disappearance. The book is packed with photographs, maps, plans and diagrams. There are many "mysteries" presented, you won't be disappointed when you buy this book. REVIEW: Ancient Egypt: we know so much about it, but there are still many unresolved questions. This volume explores and explains 70 of the most intriguing mysteries of this ancient civilization, as seventeen Egyptologists try to unlock the mysteries of Ancient Egypt in the light of recent research and discoveries. Quite often a layman wants to find authoritative answers to specific questions about the ancient world. The book manages to give these and yet retain the quality of a detective novel. REVIEW: I am quite enjoying reading this book. It's easy to read and poses many interesting theories about some of the key players and concepts in Ancient Egyptian history. It's not a whodunit but it points out things that archaeologists still scratch their heads about today and discusses potential solutions. Great book for students looking for paper topics! REVIEW: Highly entertaining! Quite often a layman wants to find authoritative answers to specific questions about the ancient world. The book manages to give these and yet retain the quality of a detective novel. It would be very good if Thames and Hudson could continue their "Seventy Greatest...." series. REVIEW: This volume of the Thames & Hudson series of 70 Great(s) is quite simply magnificent for the beginner into Egyptology and also superb for those studying any aspect of the subject and need an instant reference for confirmation or otherwise of aspects being considered at the time. A fine ook. REVIEW: The book is full of interesting ideas about the problems in Egyptology. There are some bibliographic notes for further reading. REVIEW: I love a good read, and this is just that. Nothing is like opening a new book - e-readers eat your heart out! Will be added to my bookcase to be read again and again. REVIEW: This is one of those books it's nice to dip into, and read a chapter here and a chapter there in a completely random order. It's a nicely presented coffee-table type book. Lots of good quality pictures. The chapters are quite short - 3 - 5 pages for each mystery. But they're well written and quite scholarly. REVIEW: I would read anything this author wrote on Egypt and I only wish he had or would, write more. This book was wonderful, as is his "Egyptian Hieroglyphs for Complete Beginners" which I read and studied first, and his other book on hieroglyphs. REVIEW: Very useful! Bill Manley's book is up to date and shows how much more information is needed about ancient Egypt. He emphasizes that caution must be exercised in the use of some dates and places. He also shows how much archeological activity is taking place currently. REVIEW: Enjoyed this summary of Ancient Egyptian history. A good basic book for folks interested in the highlights of archeological findings so far in Egyptology. REVIEW: What a fabulous book. I never knew about these 'mysteries' so it's very interesting to learn about REVIEW: This book is well written with many beautiful photos . REVIEW: Five stars! Fantastic read, very informative! I always ship books Media Mail in a padded mailer. This book is shipped FOR FREE via USPS INSURED media mail (“book rate”). All domestic shipments and most international shipments will include free USPS Delivery Confirmation (you might be able to update the status of your shipment on-line at the USPS Web Site) and free insurance coverage. A small percentage of international shipments may require an additional fee for tracking and/or delivery confirmation. If you are concerned about a little wear and tear to the book in transit, I would suggest a boxed shipment - it is an extra $1.00. Whether via padded mailer or box, we will give discounts for multiple purchases. International orders are welcome, but shipping costs are substantially higher. Most international orders cost an additional $12.99 to $33.99 for an insured shipment in a heavily padded mailer, and typically includes some form of rudimentary tracking and/or delivery confirmation (though for some countries, this is only available at additional cost). There is also a discount program which can cut postage costs by 50% to 75% if you’re buying about half-a-dozen books or more (5 kilos+). Rates and available services vary a bit from country to country. You can email or message me for a shipping cost quote, but I assure you they are as reasonable as USPS rates allow, and if it turns out the rate is too high for your pocketbook, we will cancel the sale at your request. ADDITIONAL PURCHASES do receive a VERY LARGE discount, typically about $5 per book (for each additional book after the first) so as to reward you for the economies of combined shipping/insurance costs. Your purchase will ordinarily be shipped within 48 hours of payment. We package as well as anyone in the business, with lots of protective padding and containers. All of our shipments are sent via insured mail so as to comply with PayPal requirements. We do NOT recommend uninsured shipments, and expressly disclaim any responsibility for the loss of an uninsured shipment. Unfortunately the contents of parcels are easily “lost” or misdelivered by postal employees – even in the USA. That’s why all of our domestic shipments (and most international) shipments include a USPS delivery confirmation tag; or are trackable or traceable, and all shipments (international and domestic) are insured. We do offer U.S. Postal Service Priority Mail, Registered Mail, and Express Mail for both international and domestic shipments, as well United Parcel Service (UPS) and Federal Express (Fed-Ex). Please ask for a rate quotation. We will accept whatever payment method you are most comfortable with. If upon receipt of the item you are disappointed for any reason whatever, I offer a no questions asked return policy. Send it back, I will give you a complete refund of the purchase price (less our original shipping costs). Most of the items I offer come from the collection of a family friend who was active in the field of Archaeology for over forty years. However many of the items also come from purchases I make in Eastern Europe, India, and from the Levant (Eastern Mediterranean/Near East) from various institutions and dealers. Though I have always had an interest in archaeology, my own academic background was in sociology and cultural anthropology. After my retirement however, I found myself drawn to archaeology as well. Aside from my own personal collection, I have made extensive and frequent additions of my own via purchases on Ebay (of course), as well as many purchases from both dealers and institutions throughout the world - but especially in the Near East and in Eastern Europe. I spend over half of my year out of the United States, and have spent much of my life either in India or Eastern Europe. In fact much of what we generate on Yahoo, Amazon and Ebay goes to support The Hermitage Museum in St. Petersburg, as well as some other worthy institutions in Europe connected with Anthropology and Archaeology. I acquire some small but interesting collections overseas from time-to-time, and have as well some duplicate items within my own collection which I occasionally decide to part with. Though I have a collection of ancient coins numbering in the tens of thousands, my primary interest is in ancient jewelry. My wife also is an active participant in the "business" of antique and ancient jewelry, and is from Russia. I would be happy to provide you with a certificate/guarantee of authenticity for any item you purchase from me. There is a $2 fee for mailing under separate cover. Whenever I am overseas I have made arrangements for purchases to be shipped out via domestic mail. If I am in the field, you may have to wait for a week or two for a COA to arrive via international air mail. But you can be sure your purchase will arrive properly packaged and promptly - even if I am absent. And when I am in a remote field location with merely a notebook computer, at times I am not able to access my email for a day or two, so be patient, I will always respond to every email. Please see our "ADDITIONAL TERMS OF SALE." TRANSLATE Arabic Chinese French German Greek Indonesian Italian Hindi Japanese Korean Swedish Portuguese Russian Spanish

PicClick Insights PicClick Exclusive

  •  Price -
  •  Popularity - 14 Views, N/A Watching, Good amount of views. 0 sold, 1 available.
  •  Seller - Great seller with very good positive feedback and over 50 ratings.

People Also Loved